NUR%20214%20Cardiovascular%20Fall%202010%20Cardiac%20Conduction%20System

NUR%20214%20Cardiovascular%20Fall%202010%20Cardiac%20Conduction%20System

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Cardiac Conduction System NUR 214
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Pumps Your Blood
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Cardiac Conduction  System The ability of the heart to pump occurs as a result of electrical stimulation to the cells Generation and transmission of electrical impulses depends on the specific properties of cardiac tissue. The electrical activity of the heart causes contraction and blood flow It is possible to have electrical activity without the heart pumping
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Properties of Cardiac Tissue Automaticity Conductivity Excitability Contractility
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Automaticity Ability to initiate an impulse Cells act as a syncytium Work as one Only cardiac cells have this ability Spontaneous depolarization of the resting cell membrane
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Conductivity Ability to transmit an impulse along a membrane in an orderly manner Spreads from cell to cell at the same time
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Excitability Ability to be electrically stimulated
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Contractility Ability to respond mechanically to an impulse Determined by how much the muscle fibers are stretched at the end of diastole
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Polarized State No Electrical Activity Takes Place The cell is ready to accept a stimulus Intracellular Ion = Potassium Extracellular Ions = Sodium and Calcium Ca ++ Na + Na + Ca ++ Na + Ca ++ Na + Ca ++ K + K +       K +        K +   K +         K +   K +       K +  
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Cell Depolarization Sodium moves into the cell Calcium moves into the cell Potassium moves out of the cell Na + Ca ++ Na + Ca ++ Na + Ca ++ Ca ++ Na +      K +                                                         K + K +                                                                          K +     K +
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course NUR 214 taught by Professor Criswell during the Spring '08 term at Purdue.

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NUR%20214%20Cardiovascular%20Fall%202010%20Cardiac%20Conduction%20System

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