chapter4 - Chapter4 AnxietyDisorders NatureofAnxietyandFear

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 Anxiety Disorders
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nature of Anxiety and Fear Fear – the present-oriented mood state Immediate fight or flight response to danger or threat Involves abrupt activation of the sympathetic nervous  system Strong avoidance/escapist tendencies Marked negative affect
Background image of page 2
Nature of Anxiety and Fear Anxiety – the future-oriented mood state Apprehension about future danger or misfortune Somatic symptoms of tension Characterized by marked negative affect Anxiety and fear are normal emotional states
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
From Normal to Disordered Anxiety  and Fear Characteristics of anxiety disorders Pervasive and persistent symptoms of anxiety and  fear Involve excessive avoidance and escape Cause clinically significant distress and impairment
Background image of page 4
The Phenomenology of  Panic Attacks What is a panic attack? Abrupt experience of intense fear or discomfort Several physical symptoms  (e.g., breathlessness, chest pain) Fear as an alarm response
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Phenomenology of  Panic Attacks  (continued) DSM-IV-TR subtypes of panic attacks Situationally bound (cued)  Unexpected (uncued)   Situationally predisposed 
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Biological Contributions to Anxiety  and Panic Genetic vulnerability Anxiety and brain circuits  Depleted levels of GABA  Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and HYPAC  axis
Background image of page 8
Biological Contributions to Anxiety  and Panic  (continued) Limbic (amygdala) and the  septal-hippocampal systems Behavioral inhibition (BIS)  Anxiety Fight/flight (FF) systems Fear
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Psychological Contributions to  Anxiety and Fear Began with Freud Anxiety is a psychic reaction to fear Anxiety involves reactivation of an infantile fear  situation
Background image of page 10
Psychological Contributions to  Anxiety and Fear  (continued)  Behavioral and cognitive views Invokes conditioning and cognitive explanations Anxiety and fear are learned responses Catastrophic thinking and appraisals play a role
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Psychological Contributions to  Anxiety and Fear  (continued)  Early childhood contributions Experiences with uncontrollability and unpredictability Social contributions Stressful life events trigger vulnerabilities
Background image of page 12
An Integrated Model Integrative view – triple vulnerability model Generalized biological vulnerability  Generalized psychological vulnerability Specific psychological vulnerability
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An Integrated Model  (continued) Common processes:  the problem of comorbidity  Comorbidity is common across the anxiety disorders Major depression is the most common secondary  diagnosis About half of patients have two or more secondary 
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 53

chapter4 - Chapter4 AnxietyDisorders NatureofAnxietyandFear

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online