handout 1 - Chapter 1 Part 3 Chapter 2 Principle 1: "The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2/14/11 Part 3 Chapter 2 Principle 2: “Respect the opinions of others, never say ‘you’re Chapter 1 Principle 1: “The only way to get the best of an argument is to Don’t Instead Argue Talk over people Blatantly interrupt others Always disagree Agree Avoid verbal fights Listen first Look for areas of agreement Why?: Because arguments are ended by. . 1. Tact 2. Diplomacy 3. Conciliation 4. A sympathetic desire to see the other person’s viewpoint Example: When you know someone is definitely wrong, it offends them if you correct them, especially if you are their guest. You can’t win an argument. You can’t because if you lose it, you lose it, and if you win it, you lose it.” Don’t Instead Prejudge or be biased Tell people they are wrong Assume Be logical Admit that you might be mistaken Ask questions Why? 1. Allows people to become reasonable 2. You will not ever get in trouble when admitting you are wrong 3. Inspires your opponent to be fair and broad-minded Example: When you tell people they are wrong, it never makes them want to agree with you. That is why it is important to make certain you are right when you think you are. “Don’t argue with your customer or your spouse or your adversary. Don’t tell them they are wrong, don’t get them stirred up. Use a little diplomacy.” Created by: Courtney Morri
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/14/11 Chapter 3 Principle 3: If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically Don’t Instead Defend your mistakes Generously apologize Criticize others Criticize your own mistakes Blame others Take responsibility for your actions Fight Yield Why? 1. You will receive courage and satisfaction out of admitting your errors 2. Others will take your side if you take theirs first 3. Admitting you are wrong diffuses arguments Example: When one knows they are wrong or have been caught, they must admit their mistakes as quick as possible. This eases the other person’s anger and lets them see their sincerity “If we are going to be rebuked, isn’t it Chapter 4 Principle 4: Begin in a friendly way Don’t Instead Force or be angry Be friendly and appreciative Become agitated with others Convince others you are a sincere friend Lose your temper Praise Why? 1. Gentleness is stronger than fury 2. A friendly approach and appreciative attitudes can make others change their minds 3. When you are friendly, others are too Example: When you are not happy with someone, try to be genuine so they see you as a friend instead of opponent. This will allow them to see your point-of-view. “A drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.” Created by: Courtney Morri
Background image of page 2
2/14/11 Part 3 Chapter 5 Principle 5: Get the other person saying  “yes, yes” immediately.  Chapter 6 Principle 6: Let the other person do a great  deal of talking.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course ENC 3250 taught by Professor Sanders during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 10

handout 1 - Chapter 1 Part 3 Chapter 2 Principle 1: "The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online