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Z331 Fall 2010 Ecampus Week 6 Lecture 2 Tension Production & Control Posted

Z331 Fall 2010 Ecampus Week 6 Lecture 2 Tension Production & Control Posted

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Week 6: Lecture 2: Chapter 10 –   Muscular Tissue: Tension Production &  Control
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Tension Production  The all–or–none principal: as a whole, a muscle fiber is either contracted  or relaxed  Tension of a Single Muscle Fiber depends  on: the number of pivoting cross-bridges the fiber’s resting length at the time of stimulation the frequency of stimulation
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Tension and Sarcomere  Length Figure 10–14
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Length–Tension Relationship Number of pivoting cross-bridges depends on: amount of overlap between thick and thin fibers Optimum overlap produces greatest amount of  tension: too much or too little reduces efficiency Normal resting  sarcomere  length is 75% to  130% of  optimal length
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Normal resting  sarcomere length  is 75% to 130% of  optimal length A single neural  stimulation produces: a single contraction or  twitch  which lasts about 7– 100 msec Sustained muscular  contractions: require many repeated  stimuli
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Myogram Twitch tension development  Figure 10–15b (Navigator) 1. Latent period before  contraction: the action potential  moves through  sarcolemma causing Ca 2+   release 2. Contraction phase:  - calcium ions bind - tension builds to  peak
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