antibiotics part II_1

antibiotics part II_1 - Antibiotics Continued NURS 324 Fall...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/16/11 Antibiotics Continued NURS 324 Fall 2010 Dr. Smith
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/16/11 Cephalosporins MOA: bind to PBPs on bacterial cell walls and cause cell death Bacteria usually develop resistance to this class by producing beta- lactamases Categorized into first, second, third, fourth generations Cef-
Background image of page 2
Cephalosporin Generations Class (example) Gram-neg activity Beta- lactamase resistance CSF distribution spectrum First gen. (cefazolin, cephalexin (Keflex)) Low Low Poor Active against gram-pos, often used for surg prophylaxis Second gen. (cefaclor, cefoxitin) Higher Higher Poor Third gen. (cefotaxime, ceftriaxone (Rocephin)) Higher Higher Good Preferred therapy for most active infections Fourth gen. (cefepime) Highest Highest Good Very broad spectrum
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/16/11 Cephalosporins Pharmacokinetic Administration/A Adverse Effects Allergic reactions
Background image of page 4
2/16/11 A patient with a history of a severe anaphylactic reaction to penicillin has an order to receive cephalosporin. The nurse should: A. administer the cephalosporin as ordered. B. contact the healthcare provider for a different antibiotic. C. administer a test dose of cephalosporin to determine reactivity. D. have an epinephrine dose available when
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/16/11 Carbapenems MOA: beta-lactam antibiotics that bind to PBPs and damage cell wall Very broad spectrum, generally resistant to beta-lactamases, but none are effective against MRSA All given parenterally
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 22

antibiotics part II_1 - Antibiotics Continued NURS 324 Fall...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online