Blackboard Doc on Using Paper Feedback (Fall 10)

Blackboard Doc on Using Paper Feedback (Fall 10) - Some...

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Unformatted text preview: Some Common Student Misconceptions About Paper Feedback: Directions: Discuss the statement(s) your group has been assigned (you don’t need to do all of them!). For each statement you’re assigned, do two things: 1) Try to figure out what is wrong with it (what words, what ideas, what assumptions, etc). 2) Rewrite it into a more accurate and productive statement about feedback and revision we can put in place of it. Take approximately 10 minutes. You can write directly on this sheet . 1) “Using paper feedback is simply a matter of correcting the mistakes a teacher has pointed out. I can probably do this just by writing in new words and sentences right on the draft my teacher marked up and putting a little check next to those spots when I’ve fixed them—once I’ve done that, I’ve revised my paper.” 2) “Pages of my paper without teacher writing on them are absolutely perfect—I don’t need to look for further examples of mistakes I’ve made elsewhere. If there were mistakes on these pages, my teacher would have marked them; after all, my paper is his/her responsibility.” 3) “Once my teacher has read my paper, revision has nothing to do with my own rethinking of my paper or parts of it—at this stage, it’s all about correcting or changing things the teacher has pointed out. Why would I bother changing or rethinking or improving something my teacher hasn’t pointed out? Why bother thinking about what I might want to improve? The whole point here is just to please my teacher and get a better grade on this paper.” 4) “Feedback on one paper has no connection whatsoever to future papers I might write—it is only important or useful to me in that it tells me how to get a better grade on this one paper in this one class. All I need to think about are the individual spots I need to correct, and once I correct all of them, there’s no need to think about the comments on this paper ever again.” 5) “My teacher said my paper has problems with content—the argument is deeply flawed or unconvincing, or the topic/my approach isn’t especially interesting or creative. So I’ve gotten a C. Sentence level changes and fixing the spots my teacher has pointed out can make it an A or B paper. Playing it safe is the best route—my paper is already passing; no point taking a risk and doing anything major.” 6) “I totally don’t get the feedback my teacher gave me—I can’t read the handwriting, and I don’t understand the points he/she is making. I’m also not really sure which of the comments are more important than the others. I’ll just do the best I can with the parts I understand. If that doesn’t work, it’s my teacher’s fault for not being clearer.” Your Paper’s H ighlights and Problem Areas The title: __ Excellent or very good! __ Could be improved No check mark= satisfactory: not bad, not great If a problem area or merely satisfactory, either you don’t have a title or it is not quite as compelling or specific as it could be. If a problem area or merely satisfactory, either you don’t have a title or it is not quite as compelling or specific as it could be....
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2011 for the course WRT 102 taught by Professor Frost during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Blackboard Doc on Using Paper Feedback (Fall 10) - Some...

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