Lecture 2 - Lecture 2 Basic Cellular Physiology and Ion...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 2 Basic Cellular Physiology and Ion Channels Water water molecules, 75% of total body weight and 99% total number of molecules pure water, a poor conductor of electricity polar molecule polar covalent bonds electronegativity dipole hydrogen bonding between water molecules Because of its polar nature water is an excellent solvent for salts, acids and bases salts, acids, bases, dissociate into ions in water Na + and Cl- NaCl table salt uncharged, cannot carry a current hydration shell Cell Membrane Cell Membrane barrier to diffusion of charged and polar molecules lipid bilayers phospholipids Phospholipids two distinct regions polar - hydrophilic, interact with water molecules nonpolar- hydrophobic, interacts with other hydrophobic molecules amphipathic Lipid Bilayer hydrophobic core like thin layer of oil fluid mosaic model integral membrane proteins amphipathic Integral membrane proteins membrane 60 (6 nm) thick hydrophobic core 30 (3 nm) thick peripheral membrane proteins cytoskeletal glycoproteins control protease more protease Hydrophobic molecules diffuse through the lipid bilayer lipophilic (hydrophobic) molecules cross the cell membrane by simple diffusion solute can dissolve into lipid membrane oxygen, carbon dioxide, fatty acids, steroid hormones Polar and charged molecules cross the cell membrane using membrane proteins Pumps- require energy in the form of ATP to move ions up concentration gradients Ion channels- facilitate diffusion of ions by creating pores in the cell membrane Transporters- do not directly require metabolic energy, often linked to ion gradients that indirectly provide the energy Active Transport Pumps Expend chemical energy in the form of ATP Membrane Pumps Na,K-ATPase Ca-ATPase H-ATPase H,K-ATPase major consumer of cellular energy...
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2011 for the course BIO 328 taught by Professor Cabot during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lecture 2 - Lecture 2 Basic Cellular Physiology and Ion...

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