Distinguishing Scholarly-Popular Sources

Distinguishing Scholarly-Popular Sources - Distinguishing...

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Distinguishing scholarly from non-scholarly periodicals (articles and papers): Journals and magazines are important sources for up-to-date information in all disciplines. Here I have divided periodical literature into four categories: Scholarly Substantive news or general interest Popular Sensational Scholarly Scholarly journals generally have a sober, serious look. They often contain many graphs and charts but few glossy pages or exciting pictures. Scholarly journals always cite their sources in the form of footnotes or bibliographies. Articles are written by a scholar or someone who has done research in the field. The language of scholarly journals is that of the discipline covered. It assumes some scholarly background on the part of the reader. The main purpose of a scholarly journal is to report on original research or experimentation to make the information available to the rest of the scholarly world. Examples of scholarly journals: American Economic Review, Archives of Sexual
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2011 for the course ENC 1102 taught by Professor Milano during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Distinguishing Scholarly-Popular Sources - Distinguishing...

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