chapter 1 - Receiver – Noise • Communication as...

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Introduction to Public Speaking Chapter 1
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Reasons to Study Public Speaking Empowerment Speaking with confidence Provides opportunities for leadership and career Employment Employers rate good communication skills as the number one factor that they seek in hiring new employees
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Conversational Speaking Just as you adapt your speaking when in a conversation, you need to adapt your speeches to your audience based on their expectations and reactions. However, public speaking differs from a conversation in several important ways…
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Public Speaking is Planned Drafts and practice Formal Use standard English grammar and vocabulary Nonverbal gestures Clearly defined in the roles of speaker and audience Audience usually does not talk
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Three Primary Communication Models Communication as action Linear model Source Message Channels
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Unformatted text preview: Receiver – Noise • Communication as interaction – Includes the components of the previous model, and adds two important elements • Feedback • Context Three Primary Communication Models (cont.) • Communication as transaction – Does not label individual components – Simultaneous process History of Public Speaking • Rhetoric – The use of words and symbols to achieve a goal – Ancient Greece – Medieval Europe – Eighteenth Century – Nineteenth Century • Declamation – Delivery of an already famous speech • Elocution – Expression of emotion through posture, movement, gestures, facial expression, and voice Diversity • Having a diverse audience means that listeners will have different expectations for your speech. – This means that you need to understand and adapt to your audience....
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2011 for the course SPC 2608 taught by Professor Eseke during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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chapter 1 - Receiver – Noise • Communication as...

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