Chapter 6 - Informally: Formally: › Demographics ›...

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Unformatted text preview: Informally: Formally: › Demographics › Surveys Open­ended questions Closed­ended questions Audience analysis is defined as “the process of examining information about the listeners who will hear your speech.” Look to establish common ground. Audience adaptation is defined as “the process of ethically using information you’ve gathered when analyzing your audience to help your audience clearly understand your message and achieve your speaking objective.” › Even though you want to adapt to your audience, you need to make sure that you do so ethically Before you start planning your speech, analyze your audience: › Demographically › Psychologically › Situationally Age Gender Sexual orientation Culture Ethnicity Race Group membership Socio­economic status Diversity Attitude Beliefs Values › Likes or dislikes › Easiest to change › What you hold to be true or false › Enduring concept of good and bad, right and wrong › Most difficult to change Credibility­others’ perception of you as trustworthy, knowledgeable, and interesting Time Location Size of audience Occasion Identifying nonverbal cues › Eye contact › Movement › Facial expressions › Nonverbal responsiveness Responding to nonverbal cues › Verbal responsiveness › See pp. 112­113 for suggestions of how to deal with an audience that seems inattentive/bored, confused, or in disagreement with your message. Use names Talk about the town, city or community Refer to a significant event that happened on the day you are speaking Refer to a recent news event Refer to a group or organization Relate information directly to your audience Nonverbal responses Verbal responses Survey responses Behavioral responses ...
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Chapter 6 - Informally: Formally: › Demographics ›...

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