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A Doll's House (Background)

A Doll's House (Background) - A Dell’s HULISE HEHEIH[BEEN...

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Unformatted text preview: A Dell’s HULISE HEHEIH [BEEN ENEIH IBEEH {IE-164905] profoundly influenced medem drama with his technique cf depicting pewerfial ancial and per Elml-Dfl'lfill tl'rerr'res thl'tlugl'i real'Er'ic dlaltzrgue and uncnmplieated tien, a style that was mil-tingle1 mnden'i in hit time. His melee tl'tfljlur We play: emeet his etanmitment te peracnal Free-darn. In the eatliu gteup. repreeented by A Dell's Heme-e {IETQL Sheets {IE-Ell], and Ari Enema ef the Feeple Udall, eeurageeua pretageniete challenge the values efthe middleacleeeeecienr in which their live. In the Inherit-mp, repteaented by The Wild Duck 1: [631} and Hedda Gable-I"; lfl'ifl}. llzeen reveals hie interest and talent in The fidd {If human pawl-elegy. llaeenwaabtrm in Sltien. Helmet. inte a peect'arnr'lyr. Finding nei- ther enjeyrment net financial success in misting a pharmacist. he decided tepmauehiahehb‘yrma met and playwright In 1351.atd‘ieage ef twerrt'prd'iree. l'u: aeeeptedan invitatientejehtthe National‘l'l'ieattt. where he performed the firnctiena cf plarwtight. diteeter. cettumer detigner. and aeeeuntant- He eentinued tci write fer the theater through teats cf ptefeesienal failures and financial. dil'flcultiee until finally. in 1315'}. The Pretender: became the first et' many m That year Ike-en left Her-way. He was diaapp-e-inted in Nit-twat": tefiual te- supper: the cecicepe ed a Scandinavian eaten-unity eE natiena. and he Felt a need Fer intellectual and emetienal independence. He lived nearly thith‘i'Efll'E in ether Eumpean eeuntriea. during which time he wtete all et his maiet playe- ettcept The Mm Builder. B1.- the time ht. tetutnetl tc Net-era? in [35". he had ad'iieved his real til leecern'tng Hera-aft great natienal dramatist. Between [311 and 13TH, Ibsen waa acquainted mm a rating Harwegian weman wheerperieheed a aituatien ee dismlbing that he jetted dewn‘Wetei Ec-ra Modern Tragedy.“ In his“Hete-.t.." hen writes: There are rwe ltindt ef metal laws. we kinds efcettacience, em: fer trienarrd ene.qr.u'tedifl?etent.fct Bremen.Tl-ie1_.rden't mderetand each ndaet', but in practical life. weirnan ia inched by maaculine law. as though she weren't a woman but a roan. . . . Pi wornen cannot be herself in modern socicttl. Ibsen created the plot of A Doll's House from those ideas. Published in December of 1379. A Doll's House attached contemporary social attitudes and conventions. lrs pmcluction. first in Europe and then throughout the world. brought Ibsen International fame The plot offii Doll's Hones was so incendiars that in February 1350 the actress who was to plat.I the part ofNo-ra in the German production refined to do so unless the final scene was rewritten with a more con- ventional ending. {With no oops-right laws to protect his worlr. lbaen teloctantls chose to rewrite the scene himself. However. the public arould tolerate nothing but the original version. so the achptation was short lived} The issues Ibsen raised blaacd bet-and the theater1 into srreers and homes. underlying these issues was a simple but important idea: The principal obligar tion of each human being is to discover who he or she is and to strive to became d-iat person. In the process one rmsr be free to quesoon existing conditions- Ibsen was 1«lists-eel by his contemporaries as a moral and social resolutionars who advocated female emancipation and intellectual freedom. In fact. however. he believed that freedom must roots from wid-iin individuals rather dtan from the efforts ofaacial and political organisations. He declared: "I have never written any plea to hrs-theta social purpose. l have been more of a peer and lessofaso-cial philosopher than most people seem inclined to Iseliesre." and “What is reall1.r wanted is a resolution of the spirit of man." Toda-r. a century later, .r't Doll's House continues to raise important issues about semiarid-ripe bemeen women and men: the right ofwornen to determine and direct the course of their own lives; the role of the wife in a marriage: and. peripheralls, do right of women to enjoa equal opp-Mimics and recognition in the business world. CHARACTERS mam HELHEI. Horas tomes. on. earn: Hit-‘3 marlin ...
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