Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States 2007 - Introduction

Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States 2007 - Introduction

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Skip Navigation U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences NewsFlash Staff Contact Site Index Help Publications Search Publications Recent Publications Data Products Last 6 Months Subject Index A-Z Data Licenses Surveys Assessments Early Childhood Elementary/Secondary International Library Postsecondary Resources Data Tools Locators Peer Tools Questionnaire Item Banks Build Custom Tables and Datasets State/District Profiles Offsite Archive of NCES Data Figures Search Tables/Figures Popular Keyword Title Searches Fast Facts Assessments
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Early Childhood Elementary/Secondary International Library Postsecondary Resources School, College, Search for Schools, Colleges, and Libraries College Navigator Search for Public Schools Search for Public School Districts Search for Private Schools Search for Public Libraries Annual Reports Condition of Education Digest of Education Statistics High School Dropout and Completion Rates Projections of Education Statistics What's New What's New at NCES Recent Publications Conferences/Training StatChat Press Releases Funding Jobs About Us About NCES Commissioner Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2007 NCES 2009-064 September 2009 Introduction Acknowledgments
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Selected Findings References List of Figures List of Tables Appendix A–Technical Notes Appendix B–Glossary Appendix C–Standard Error Tables Contact Introduction Dropping out of high school is related to a number of negative outcomes. For example, the median income of persons ages 18 through 65 who had not completed high school was roughly $24,000 in 2007. 1 By comparison, the median income of persons ages 18 through 65 who completed their education with a high school credential, including a General Educational Development (GED) certificate, was over $40,000. Among adults ages 25 and older, a lower percentage of dropouts are in the labor force compared with adults who earned a high school credential. Among adults in the labor force, a higher percentage of dropouts are unemployed compared with adults who earned a high school credential ( U.S. Department of Labor 2007 ). Further, dropouts ages 25 or older reported being in worse health than adults who are not dropouts, regardless
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Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States 2007 - Introduction

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