L2W10_MIC105_Culturing

L2W10_MIC105_Culturing - Bacterial Nutrition and Culturing...

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1/6/2010 1 Bacterial Nutrition and Culturing
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1/6/2010 2 Importance of Culturing and Microbial Diversity >99% of microorganisms have yet to be cultivated in the lab: undescribed physiology Most information is based on a very minute % of total population Majority of cultivated organisms are “weeds” *
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1/6/2010 3 The Delft School of Microbiology M.W. Beijerinck (1851-1931) Enrichment culture A.J. Kluyver (1888-1956) Comparative biochemistry C.B. van Neil (1897-1985) Stanford- Hopkins Marine Station Microbial Diversity Course
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1/6/2010 4 The Delft School of Microbiology 1. General microbiology is a distinct subject area in its own right within biology. 2. Microbiology embraces biochemistry, physiology, morphology, ecology, and evolution. J.W.M. la Riviere. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 71: 3-13, 1997. Isolation and cultivation of organisms that are distinguished by their physiological, biochemical, and morphological properties
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1/6/2010 5 The Delft School of Microbiology 3. General microbiology seeks comprehensive understanding of the microbial world and its significance for man by taking into account: - physiology of the organism in relation to its natural environment - role of microbes in the biosphere and ecosystems in which they occur - applications for agriculture, medicine, industry, and environmental management through biotechnology J.W.M. la Riviere. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 71: 3-13, 1997.
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1/6/2010 6 The Delft School of Microbiology Enrichments and isolations: Sulfate reducers Sulfur oxidizers Nitrate reducers urea degraders Luminescent bacteria Lactic acid bacteria Cellulose degraders Agar degraders Hydrogen oxidizers Methane oxidizers Anaerobic sporeformers J.W.M. la Riviere. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 71: 3-13, 1997.
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1/6/2010 7 The Delft School of Microbiology: alive and well in California C.B. van Neil R.E. Hungate (UC Davis**) R.S. Wolfe R. Stanier (UC Berkeley) M. Doudoroff (UC Berkeley) H.A. Barker H. Jannasch N. Pfenning J. Lederberg Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University D.C. Nelson (UC Davis) M.L. Wheelis (UC Davis*) L.N. Ornston C.S. Harwood R.E. Parales (UC Davis) J. Ingram (UC Davis*) W. Sistrom J.C. Meeks (UC Davis) P. Baumann (UC Davis*) *Retired; **Deceased Talia
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1/6/2010 8 Norm Pace UC Berkeley Carl Woese U. Illinois S. Giovannoni Oregon State D. Stahl Univ. of Washington E. Engert Cornell E. DeLong MIT Scott Dawson UC Davis Marissa Brystal Derrick Dr. Dawson s lineage (Currently at U. Colorado) Ralph Wolfe U. Illinois
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1/6/2010 9 Microbial nutrition: what do they need to survive and grow? Microbes need to obtain everything for biosynthesis of cell material and generation of energy from the environment.
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L2W10_MIC105_Culturing - Bacterial Nutrition and Culturing...

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