Potyvirusslides

Potyvirusslides - Taxonomically the potyviruses are in the...

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Taxonomically the potyviruses are in the family Potyviridae . There are six genera in the family: Vector Genus Potyvirus Aphids Genus Bymovirus Soilborne fungi Genus Rymovirus Mites Genus Ipomovirus Whiteflies Genus Tritimovirus Mites Genus Macluravirus Aphids We are only talking today about those in the genus Potyvirus Potyviruses are among the most widespread and economically important of the plant viruses. Various potyviruses occur worldwide. Potyviruses are important tools for fundamental virology. There are currently 18 families ( dae ) of plant viruses; plus 81 genera ( virus ; not including viroids and other subviral agents). Not all genera are within assigned families at this time, and some new genera and families are not shown at right. According to Hull, (page 87) he says there are 977 species of plant viruses as of 2002, more are being identified all the time. Within the genus Potyvirus , there are more than 100 definitive and tentative species. •No true dsDNA viruses •Retro types contain dsDNA 75% are ssRNA •Few minus & ambisense ssRNA genomes Lettuce mosaic virus The same virus can cause different types of symptoms due to environmental conditions, time of infection, host cultivar etc. Thus identification based only on symptoms is not reliable. LMV almost eliminated the Salinas Valley lettuce industry in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s when it was a primary causal agent of the “June yellows” syndrome.
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Potyvirus symptoms are obvious mosaics on leaves, flowers and even fruits. RNA silencing resistance has been demonstrated in many plants against many types of viruses, but still has been developed for use in the U.S. for two commercial crop plants, yellow crookneck squash and papaya. Field infection, effects of viruses on non-transgenic and virus-resistant transgenic yellow crookneck squash. Field trial of transgenic 'UH Rainbow' and 'UH SunUp' was established in Puna in October 1995. Slides show the progress of the disease caused by PRSV in rows of nontransgenic papaya (left in picture) as compared to the resistance in rows of 'UH Rainbow' (right in picture). Aerial view of transgenic field trial in Puna that was started in October 1995. The solid block of green papaya trees are 'UH- Rainbow' while the surrounding papaya trees that are nearly dead are nontransgenic papaya trees severely infected by PRSV. Papaya ringspot virus in Hawaii
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Potato Y potyvirus Turnip mosaic potyvirus Tobacco etch potyvirus Tulip breaking potyvirus Pepper mottle potyvirus Banana black streak potyvirus Watermelon mosaic potyvirus Cassava brown streak potyvirus Papaya ringspot potyvirus Peanut stripe potyvirus Zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus Vanilla necrosis potyvirus Maize dwarf mosaic virus Asparagus virus 1 Onion yellow dwarf virus Carrot thin-leaf potyvirus Plum pox potyvirus Sweet potato feathery mottle potyvirus Lettuce mosaic potyvirus Bean common mosaic potyvirus Celery mosaic potyvirus Soybean mosaic potyvirus Beet mosaic potyvirus Dasheen mosaic potyvirus Some important potyviruses A n
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Potyvirusslides - Taxonomically the potyviruses are in the...

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