e34 - Introduction meter comes from the Greek term for...

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1 Introduction meter – comes from the Greek term for measure poetry written in a regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables the recognition and naming of broad wave patterns in lines of verse (like waves on the shore or the wave patterns of sounds in physics)
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2 Meter continued there are a succession of lines or sentences that have the same metrical pattern, but is not necessarily exactly rhythmically identical lines are repeated again and again in the same broad rhythmical patterns, creating a rhythmical unit eg: “To this I witness call the fools of Time Which die for goodness, who have lived for crime.”
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Poetry has Feet the technical meaning – has one stressed syllable and one or more unstressed syllables or has one unstressed syllable and one or more stressed syllables is a measurable, patterned, conventional unit of poetic rhythm the non-technical meaning – connected to how we walk pattern and rhythm of steps equal to
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2011 for the course ENG 1001 taught by Professor Hager during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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e34 - Introduction meter comes from the Greek term for...

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