As26 - Exploring the Solar System all about spacecraft/spaceflight I How can we explore the Solar System types of space missions I How do we get

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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 1 Exploring the Solar System: all about spacecraft/spaceflight I. How do we get there? - launch & orbits - gravity assist - fuel/propulsion I. How can we explore the Solar System? - types of space missions III. Onboard Systems - everything but the kitchen sink…
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 2 1. Flyby Missions usually the first phase of exploration spacecraft following continuous orbit - around the Sun - escape trajectory (heading off into deep space)
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 3 Famous Example: VOYAGER 2 - launch 1977 with VOYAGER 1 - flew by Jupiter in 1979 - Saturn in 1980/1981 - Uranus (V2) in 1986 - Neptune in 1989 - will continue to interstellar space - study of interplanetary space particles (Van Allen) - data expected until 2020 Clouds on Neptune Interplanetary Space & the Solar Wind
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 4 Other Flyby examples: Underway: Stardust Comet return mission - launched in 1999 - interstellar dust collection - asteroid Annefrank flyby - Comet encounter (Jan 2004) - Earth/sample return (Jan 2006)
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 5 Future flyby: Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission - to be launched in January 2006 - swing by Jupiter (gravity assist*) - fly by Pluto & moon Charon in 2015 - then head into Kuiper Belt region (tons of solar system debris) - to study objects that are like Pluto
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 6 2. Orbiter Spacecraft designed to travel to distant planet & enter into orbit around planet must carry substantial propulsion (fuel) capacity has to withstand: - staying in the ‘dark’ for periods of time - extreme thermal variations - staying out of touch with Earth for periods of time usually the second phase of exploration
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 7 Famous Example: Galileo - why would a mission to Jupiter be called Galileo? - launched in 1989 aboard Atlantis Space Shuttle - entered into Jupiter’s orbit in 1995 Burned up in Jupiter’s atmosphere last week!
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29 Sept 03 Solar System - Dr. C.C. Lang 8 3. Atmospheric Spacecraft - relatively short mission - collect data about the atmosphere of a planet or planet’s moon - usually piggy back on a bigger craft - needs no propulsion of its own - takes direct measurements of atmosphere - usually is destroyed; rest of spacecraft continues its mission Example: Galileo’s atmospheric probe
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2011 for the course AST 1002 taught by Professor Dr.haywoodsmith,jr during the Spring '07 term at University of Florida.

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As26 - Exploring the Solar System all about spacecraft/spaceflight I How can we explore the Solar System types of space missions I How do we get

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