HW2 solution

HW2 solution - WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY ASSIGNMENT#2 Dt SARANYA CHUNDI PERSON 3682-1064 1 Denial of Service attacks in wireless networks In

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY ASSIGNMENT #2 Dt: Feb 26, 2010 SARANYA CHUNDI PERSON #: 3682-1064
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Denial of Service attacks in wireless networks In wireless networks, the denial of service attacks can be classified into two types: the attacks at the routing layer and the attacks at the MAC layer. Because of the mobility, limited bandwidth, routing functionalities, the wireless networks are vulnerable to these attacks. While the former attack disrupts the routing in the network, the latter disrupts the channel access and causes wastage of resources (bandwidth and power). These attacks cause severe degradation of network throughput and latency. Attacks at the routing layer: a) A malicious node participates in routing but drops in a certain number of packets. This flood of packets deteriorates the quality of connections and further deterioration occurs if the transport layer protocol that is used is TCP. This attack can be handled by increasing the confidence levels to nodes and by following those routes that provide the highest confidence levels. b) A malicious node transmits wrong routing packets. This causes frequent route failures which degrade the network performance. c) A malicious node could replay false updates which could again lead to frequent route failures and network performance degradation. The above two attacks can be handled by providing end-to-end authentication. d) A malicious node could reduce the Time-to-Live field in the IP header which makes the packet never reach its destination. This attack can be handled by making sure that the Time-to-Live field has the value that is greater than the hop count to the required destination. Attacks at the MAC layer: a) If a channel that is being reused is kept busy in the vicinity of a node, it results in the DoS attack at that node. b) If a node continuously relays spurious data, the battery life of the node may be drained. These attacks can be handled by providing end-to-end authentication. If a certificate of authentication from a node is not included, it might be prevented from accessing the channel. Difference between DoS and DDoS In a DoS attack, one computer and one internet connection is used to flood the server with packets. The goal is to overload the server’s bandwidth and other resources. This makes the server inaccessible to others. The DoS attack may result in either the victim machine slowing down or crashing all together. The Distributed Denial of Service attack utilizes many computers and many connections. The computers are often distributed around the world and are part of the “botnet”. The victim is
Background image of page 2
overloaded by thousands of requests. The DDoS is a DoS attack organized to occur simultaneously from a large number of computers. References:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/16/2011 for the course CSE 566 taught by Professor Dr.shamboo during the Fall '10 term at SUNY Buffalo.

Page1 / 11

HW2 solution - WIRELESS NETWORK SECURITY ASSIGNMENT#2 Dt SARANYA CHUNDI PERSON 3682-1064 1 Denial of Service attacks in wireless networks In

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online