CH_14student

CH_14student - Chapter14 PoisonEntryMethods 1.Ingestion...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
POISONING EMERGENCIES Chapter 14
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Poison Entry Methods 1.   Ingestion 2. Inhalation 3. Injection 4. Absorption
Background image of page 2
Poison Control Specialized health care centers that provide  information and advice about care for poisoning  victims. Most centers are staffed 24 hours per day Answer more than 2 million calls per year Calls are toll free Number can be found in the phonebook Update their information every 90 days When in doubt call
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ingested Poisons Most commonly ingested items are:   Aspirin Acetaminophen Alcohol Detergents/soaps Household cleaning products Petroleum distillates Houseplants Outdoor plants *Pits of cherries, peaches, apricots, and other fruit have  enough cyanide to cause death*
Background image of page 4
Ingested Poisons Dangerous household and outdoor plants: Morning glory Rhubarb leaves Mountain laurel Daisy Daffodil Lily of the Valley Tulip Poinsettia Parts of tomato, potato, asparagus and petunia plants
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ingested Poisons Things that are safe in a small amount can be  poisonous when swallowed in large amounts Remain in the stomach a short time Most absorption takes place in the small intestine Goal is to rid the body of poison before it enters the  intestinal tract
Background image of page 6
Ingested Poisons The Importance of Taking a History Signs and Symptoms Varying levels of unconsciousness, from drowsiness to  unconsciousness Abdominal pain, tenderness, bloating, and/or cramps Burns or stains around the mouth, pain in the mouth or throat,  and/or pain during swallowing (corrosive poisons may corrode,  burn, or destroy the tissues of the mouth, throat, and stomach) Unusual breath or body odors; characteristic chemical odors  (such as turpentine) on the breath Excessive salivation  Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea If you have even slight suspicion that a person has           been  poisoned, give first aid care
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
  8
Background image of page 8
First Aid Care 1. Maintain the airway and monitor the victim’s airway, breathing, circulation, and  disabilities (ABCDs).  2. If the poison was a corrosive (acid) or caustic (alkali), immediately give the  victim one or two 8-ounce glasses of cold water or milk to dilute the poison as  instructed by Poison Control. Do not give water or milk in any other case unless  you are told to do so by the Poison Control Center.  3. Place the victim on his or her left side.   4. Call Poison Control; an estimated three-fourths of all ingested poison 
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course HK 280 taught by Professor Trembath during the Fall '07 term at Purdue.

Page1 / 25

CH_14student - Chapter14 PoisonEntryMethods 1.Ingestion...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online