CH_19student

CH_19student - Ch.19AcuteAbdominal Ch.19AcuteAbdominal...

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Ch. 19-Acute Abdominal  Ch. 19-Acute Abdominal  Distress Distress and Related Emergencies and Related Emergencies  
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Abdominal Distress Common form of first aid May be minor or emergency Often are not able to determine the cause
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Considerations Type of pain Location of pain Length of pain
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Determine whether the victim is restless or quiet, and  whether movement causes pain. Look to see whether the abdomen is bloated  (distended). Confirm the abnormal contour with the victim. Feel the abdomen very gently to determine whether it  is tense or soft (see Figure 19–3) and whether any  masses are present; never press on a pulsating  abdominal mass. If you know that a specific quadrant  is causing the pain or the majority of the pain, examine  that quadrant last. Determine whether the abdomen is tender when  touched and whether the victim can relax the  abdominal wall     upon request. Note any abdominal  guarding. Determine the location and quadrant of the pain.
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CH_19student - Ch.19AcuteAbdominal Ch.19AcuteAbdominal...

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