CHP23 - Ch.23BitesandStings Ch.23BitesandStings 1 PoisonousSnakes Largefangs ,muchlikethoseofacat oneachsideofthehead

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Ch. 23-Bites and Stings Ch. 23-Bites and Stings 1
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Poisonous Snakes Large fangs Vertical slits for pupils, much like those of a cat A heat-sensitive pit between the eye and the nostril  on each side of the head A variety of differently shaped blotches on a  background of pink, yellow, olive, tan, gray, or  brown skin The triangular head is larger than the neck  2
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Severity of Snakebite The location of the bite (fatty tissue absorbs the  venom more slowly than muscle tissue) Whether disease-causing organisms are in the  venom The size and weight of the victim The general health and condition of the victim How much physical activity the victim engaged in  immediately following the bite (physical activity  helps spread venom) 3
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Signs and Symptoms of  Snakebite Two distinct fang marks about half an inch apart at the bite site,  which may or may not bleed (in some cases there may be only  one fang mark) Immediate and severe burning pain and swelling around the fang  marks, usually within 5 minutes but sometimes taking as long as  4 hours to develop (swelling may affect the entire arm or leg) Purplish discoloration and blood-filled blisters around the bite,  usually within 2 to 10 hours  Numbness around the bite 4
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Indiana Non-poisonous  Snakes Garter snake Racer Rat snake Water snake Bull snake King snake Milk snake Fox snake 5 Garter snake Garter snake Bull snake Bull snake
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Indiana Poisonous Snakes Water moccasins Copperheads Rattlesnake These are all pit vipers 6 Water moccasin Water moccasin copperhead copperhead rattlesnake rattlesnake
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First Aid Care for Snakebite Regardless of the type of snakebite, never: Cut the skin, which can cause infection Use suction of any kind Use a tourniquet, which can result in loss of a limb Apply ice, which causes more rapid absorption of  the venom Use electric shock, which can cause severe injury 7
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First Aid Care for Snakebite Instead, do the following: 1. Treat a  nonpoisonous snakebite  as you would any minor wound; clean with soap and  water, cover with a dry sterile dressing, and seek medical advice. 2. For 
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course HK 280 taught by Professor Trembath during the Fall '07 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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CHP23 - Ch.23BitesandStings Ch.23BitesandStings 1 PoisonousSnakes Largefangs ,muchlikethoseofacat oneachsideofthehead

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