pa4 - 11/1/10
 Percep*on
and
Ac*on
 • 

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Unformatted text preview: 11/1/10
 Percep*on
and
Ac*on
 •  “We
must
perceive
in
order
to
move,
but
we
 must
also
move
in
order
to
perceive”
~
James
 Gibson
 •  Coupling
of
percep*on
and
ac*on
 Percep*on
and
Ac*on
 •  Ac*on
influencing
percep*on
 Visual
Cliff
 1
 11/1/10
 Visual
Cliff
 •  Infants
have
early
sensi*vity
to
depth
 percep*on
(last
week’s
lecture)
 •  Prelocomotor
infants
 –  Heart
rate
decelera*on
when
held
over
the
deep
 side
of
cliff
vs.
the
shallow
side
 Visual
Cliff
 Visual
Cliff
 •  Not
a
measure
of
depth
percep*on!
 •  Novice
crawlers
are
not
afraid
of
depth;
will
 cross
the
visual
cliff
 •  Expert
crawlers
are
afraid
of
depth;
will
not
 cross
the
visual
cliff
 2
 11/1/10
 Visual
Cliff
 •  Campos
study:
role
of
early
experience
 •  Experience
with
op*c
flow

depth
 percep*on/
beWer
understanding
of
what
 depth
means
 Visual
Cliff
 Percep*on
and
Ac*on
 •  Percep*on‐ac*on
dissocia*on
 3
 11/1/10
 Dorsal‐Ventral
Visual
Streams
 Perceptual
Illusions
 Percep*on
info:
ventral
stream
 Manual
 Es*ma*on
 Haffenden
&
Goodale
(1998)
 4
 11/1/10
 Ac*on
info:
Dorsal
Stream
 Grasping
 Haffenden
&
Goodale
(1998)
 Percep*on‐Ac*on
 •  Dissocia*on
of
percep*on
and
ac*on
in
 children
 –  Scale
errors
 Scale
Error
 5
 11/1/10
 Scale
Errors
 Scale
Errors

 Scale
Errors:
 experimental
sebng
(DeLoache,
2004)

 6
 11/1/10
 Scale
Error:
 Everyday
occurrences
 Scale
Errors:
 daycare/
preschool
classrooms
 •  Infant
classrooms
 •  Toddler
classrooms
 •  2‐year‐old
rooms
 Scale
Errors
 •  Possible
explana*ons?
 7
 11/1/10
 Scale
Errors
as
Ac*on
Errors
 1.  Dorsal‐Ventral
stream
development
 2.  Inhibitory
Control

 Scale
Error:
 Object
size
errors
 •  Size
discrepancy
between
two
objects
 Visual‐Motor
Coordina*on
 •  Ability
to
coordinate
visual
abili*es
with
 movements
of
the
body
 •  Coincident
*ming
 –  Ability
to
*me
self‐movements
with
an
object
 8
 11/1/10
 Catching

 •  The
ac*on
of
bringing
an
airborne
object
 under
control
by
using
the
hands
and
 arms
 Developmental
Aspects:


 Two‐handed
Catching
 •  First
aWempt
to
stop
a
rolling
object
is
to
sit
on
 floor
with
legs
spread
apart
 –  Legs
trap
ball
 –  Hands
trap
ball
 •  First
aWempt
at
an
airborne
object
is
passive
 –  Tosser
throws
ball
so
the
child
can
use
the
 outstretched
arms
and
body
to
catch
 Developmental
Aspects:


 Two‐handed
Catching
 2-year-old • Focuses on the tosser, not the ball • Maintains a static position • Reacts too late 5-year-old • Can anticipate some of the ball’s changing flight pattern • Can focus on thrower, ball, and own hands •  Movements are correct, but are carried out in slow motion 15-year-old • Can predict the ball’s flight • Carries out preparatory sequences to catch the ball • Movements are smooth (Kay,
1970)
 9
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course HK 453 taught by Professor Claxton during the Fall '10 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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