inddiff

inddiff - HK 258 00 Foundations of Motor Skill Acquisition...

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HK 258 00 Foundations of Motor Skill Acquisition Spring 2010 Page 1 Laboratory 3 – Individual Differences Individual Differences and Motor Performance At the heart of our examination of the factors that makes one individual perform differently than another individual is the notion that a person’s level of skill is a function of the quantity and quality of practice, and the underlying strength of that person’s ability(ies) necessary to perform that skill. We can write this idea into an equation: Skill = f (practice, ability) That equation states that skill equals a function of practice and ability. Of course we do not know the relative contribution of practice and ability. In other words, is ability more or less important than practice. There is a diversity of opinion on this matter. For example Ericsson et al. (1993) believe that it is only high quality practice that matters. Although there are other opinions on this matter (Freeman, 1998). There are three basic models about the nature of abilities that support performance. First, we define ability as a trait, not modifiable by practice that is used to perform a task. In everyday language, a sportscaster might call that “talented”. To be clear, with practice, skill improves, but ability(ies) or talent(s) stay the same. So, in the 1930s, 40s and 50s, the prevailing idea was that people possessed a single motor ability, called general motor ability (GMA) that was the crucial ability (talent) to perform all motor skills. Again is
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inddiff - HK 258 00 Foundations of Motor Skill Acquisition...

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