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Anxiety%20Disorders0

Anxiety%20Disorders0 - Anxiety Disorders Chapter 6 Click to...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/18/11 Anxiety Disorders Chapter 6 11
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2/18/11 Anxiety Disorders Anxiety - An emotional state characterized by physiological arousal, unpleasant feelings of tension, and a sense of apprehension or foreboding. Anxiety disorder - A class of psychological disorders characterized by excessive or maladaptive anxiety reactions.
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2/18/11 Overview of anxiety disorders Anxiety is characterized by a wide range of symptoms that cut across physical, behavioral, and cognitive domains: a) Physical features. b) Behavioral features. c) Cognitive features.
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2/18/11 Overview of anxiety disorders The DSM recognizes the following specific types of anxiety disorders we discuss in this chapter: Panic disorder Phobic disorders Obsessive–compulsive disorder Generalized anxiety disorder Acute stress disorder Posttraumatic stress disorder
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2/18/11 Panic disorder Panic disorder - A type of anxiety disorder characterized by repeated episodes of intense anxiety or panic. There is a stronger bodily component to panic attacks than to other forms of anxiety. - significant physiological arousal The attacks are accompanied by feelings of sheer terror and a sense of imminent danger or impending doom and by an urge to escape the situation.
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2/18/11
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2/18/11 Panic disorder Agoraphobia - Excessive, irrational fear of open or public places. For a diagnosis of panic disorder to be made, the person must have experienced repeated, unexpected panic attacks, and at least one of the attacks must be followed by one of the following : a) At least a month of persistent fear of subsequent attacks. b) Worry about the implications or consequences of the attack. c) Significant change in behavior.
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2/18/11 Prevalence of panic disorder by gender Panic disorder affects about two times as many women as men.
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2/18/11 Theoretical Perspectives The prevailing view of panic disorder reflects a combination of cognitive and biological factors, of misattributions misperceptions of underlying causes) on the one hand and physiological reactions on the other. Perceiving these bodily sensations as dire threats induces anxiety, which is accompanied by activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The changes in bodily sensations that trigger a panic attack may result from many factors, such as unrecognized hyperventilation (rapid breathing), exertion, changes in temperature, or reactions to certain drugs or medications.
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2/18/11 Biological Factors Evidence suggests that genetic factors are at work in explaining proneness to panic disorder The biological underpinnings of panic attacks may involve an unusually sensitive alarm system or fear network in the brain involving the limbic system and frontal lobes that normally respond to cues of threat or danger. -“ Fight or Flight ” reaction is triggered unnecessarily
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2/18/11 Cognitive Factors -In referring to the anxiety facing the nation in the wake of the economic depression of the 1930s, President Franklin Roosevelt said in his 1932 inaugural address, “We have nothing to fear but fear itself.”
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