Biological%20and%20Psycholgical%20Perspectives-1

Biological%20and%20Psycholgical%20Perspectives-1 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/18/11 Biological Perspective on Abnormal Behavior
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Structures of a neuron
Background image of page 2
The cell body Round, centrally located structure Contains DNA Controls protein manufacturing Directs metabolism No role in neural signaling Contains the cell’s Nucleus
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dendrites Information collectors Receive inputs from neighboring neurons Inputs may number in thousands If enough inputs the cell’s AXON may
Background image of page 4
Dendritic Growth Mature neurons generally can’t divide But new dendrites can grow Provides room for more connections to other neurons New connections are basis for learning
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Axon The cell’s output structure One axon per cell, 2 distinct parts tubelike structure branches at end that connect to dendrites of other cells
Background image of page 6
Myelin sheath White fatty casing on axon Acts as an electrical insulator Not present on all cells When present increases the speed of neural signals down the axon. Myelin Sheath
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2/18/11 How neurons communicate Neurons communicate by means of transmission of neural impulses “Messages” are based on the release of neurotransmitters from one neuron (at axon terminal) and absorbed by another neuron (by the dendrites of the cell body) Neurotransmitters cross over “synapse” Abnormalities are associated with irregular transmission or reception f neural impulses
Background image of page 8
Neuron to Neuron Axons branch out and end near dendrites of neighboring cells Axon terminals are the tips of the axon’s branches A gap separates the axon terminals from dendrites Gap is the Synapse Cell Body Dendrite Axon
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Synapse axon terminals contain small storage sacs called synaptic vesicles vesicles contain neurotransmitter molecules Sending Neuron Synapse Axon Termina l
Background image of page 10
Neurotransmitter Release Action Potential causes vesicle to open Neurotransmitter released into synapse Locks onto receptor molecule in postsynaptic membrane
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major Neurotransmitters in the Neurotransmitter Role Acetylcholine (Ach) A neurotransmitter used by the spinal cord neurons to control muscles and by many neurons in the brain to regulate memory. In most instances, acetylcholine is excitatory. ( Connected with Alzheimer’s ) Dopamine The neurotransmitter that produces feelings of pleasure when released by the brain reward system. Dopamine has multiple functions depending on where in the brain it acts. It is usually inhibitory. ( Related to symptoms of Schizophrenia) Norepinephrine Norepinephrine acts as a neurotransmitter and a hormone. In the peripheral nervous system, it is part of the flight-or-flight response.
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 43

Biological%20and%20Psycholgical%20Perspectives-1 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online