16 Porosity and Sinkholes 5

16 Porosity and - Dissolution chemical erosion of limestone at the surface Cover Subsidence Sands Carbonates Overlying material of mostly thick

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Dissolution chemical erosion of limestone at the surface. Cover Subsidence Sands Carbonates Overlying material of mostly thick sands and perhaps some clays Cover Subsidence Granular sediments Granular spill into secondary openings in the underlying carbonate rocks. carbonate A column of column overlying sediments settles into the vacated spaces (a process termed "piping"). The slow downward erosion eventually forms small surface depressions 1 inch to several feet in depth and diameter. diameter. Dissolution and Dissolution infilling continue, forming a noticeable depression in the land surface. Overburden is generally sandy Cover Collapse Sands Clays Carbonates Thick layer of clay overlying carbonates Cover Collapse Sediments spill Sediments into a cavity. into As spilling As continues, the cohesive covering sediments form a structural arch. structural The cavity The migrates upward by progressive roof collapse. roof The cavity The eventually breaches the ground surface, creating sudden and dramatic sinkholes. Thick, Clayey overburden Cover Collapse sand clay limestone sand clay ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course SWS 2007 taught by Professor bonczek during the Fall '09 term at University of Florida.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online