BACTERIAL AGENTS (S)

BACTERIAL AGENTS (S) - 1 Bacterial Agents Joan M. Culley,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1 Bacterial Agents Joan M. Culley, PhD, MPH, RN, CWOCN Revised Sept 2010 2 Objectives Identify potential biological agents Describe clinical disease and outcomes Discuss diagnostic issues Outline treatment and prophylaxis regimens Describe the use of personal protective procedures to increase protection against biological agents 3 WHY WOULD A TERRORIST CONSIDER A BIOLOGICAL WEAPON? Agent easily obtained or produced Relatively inexpensive to produce Delivery modes readily available Possible dissemination over wide area Difficult to detect (odorless, colorless) Large number of casualties possible Threatened use may cause fear/panic Perpetrators escape days before effects are seen 4 MAXIMUM CREDIBLE EVENT Well-funded Organization or State-supported Capability of producing weapons-grade agents Proper aerosol dispersal mechanism Intent: Kill large numbers Overwhelm Resources Cause massive societal disruption 5 HIGHEST THREAT Dispersed in an aerosol Highly lethal agent Production capability/knowledge Lack of treatment or vaccine Communicable Mere threat of use creates panic Aerosol / Infectivity Relationship 18-20 15-18 7-12 4-6 (bronchioles) 1-5 (alveoli) Infection Severity Particle Size (Micron, Mass Median Diameter) The ideal aerosol contains a homogeneous population of 2 or 3 micron particulates that contain one or more viable organisms Maximum human respiratory infection is a particle that falls within the 1 to 5 micron size Less Severe More Severe 7 AGENTS OF CONCERN Anthrax Smallpox Plague Tularemia Botulinum Toxins VHF Bacteria As Biological Agents Bacteria Single-celled microorganism Invade tissue; cause inflammatory reaction or produce toxins May form spores Anthrax Plague Tularemia Q Fever 9 Agents to be Discussed Plague Tularemia Brucellosis Q Fever Anthrax 10 Agents With Greatest Potential To Cause Mass Casualties Anthrax and Smallpox Anthrax and Smallpox Well demonstrated historical devastation potential Both highly lethal agents Stable in aerosol Devastating psychological impact Produced in large quantities 11 Plague Yersinia pestis bacteria Plague - Microbiology Yersinia pestis- gram(-), non-motile, non-spore forming bacillus Fleas living on infected rodents spread infection to humans Recovery offers temporary immunity 13 Plague Organism Yersinia pestis Gram negative bacillus History Biblical (I Samuel V:6,9) 1320 BC Philistines Major Pandemics 541 - Plague of Justinian 1346 - Black Death 1894 - Modern Pandemic Arrival in the U.S. Plague Endemic Counties http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/plague/ Plague Endemic in US 15 16 Threat Potential Previous use as bioweapon WWII Unit 731 Manchuria (1932-45) Aerosol spread Highly contagious Potentially lethal Food or water contamination Plague - Pathogenesis...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/16/2011 for the course NURS 504 taught by Professor Culley during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

Page1 / 87

BACTERIAL AGENTS (S) - 1 Bacterial Agents Joan M. Culley,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 17. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online