BLAST INJURIES

BLAST INJURIES - C opied from the Centers for Disease...

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Copied from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website. Accessed February 24, 2009 from http://emergency.cdc.gov/masscasualties/blastinjuryf acts.asp Blast Injuries: Essential Facts Key Concepts Bombs and explosions can cause unique patterns of injury seldom seen outside combat Expect half of all initial casualties to seek medical care over a one-hour period Most severely injured arrive after the less injured, who bypass EMS triage and go directly to the closest hospitals Predominant injuries involve multiple penetrating injuries and blunt trauma Explosions in confined spaces (buildings, large vehicles, mines) and/or structural collapse are associated with greater morbidity and mortality Primary blast injuries in survivors are predominantly seen in confined space explosions Repeatedly examine and assess patients exposed to a blast All bomb events have the potential for chemical and/or radiological contamination Triage and life saving procedures should never be delayed because of the possibility of radioactive contamination of the victim; the risk of exposure to caregivers is small Universal precautions effectively protect against radiological secondary contamination of first responders and first receivers For those with injuries resulting in nonintact skin or mucous membrane exposure, hepatitis B immunization (within 7 days) and age-appropriate tetanus toxoid vaccine (if not current) Blast Injuries Primary: Injury from over-pressurization force (blast wave) impacting the body surface o TM rupture, pulmonary damage and air embolization, hollow viscus injury Secondary: Injury from projectiles (bomb fragments, flying debris) o Penetrating trauma, fragmentation injuries, blunt trauma Tertiary: Injuries from displacement of victim by the blast wind
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o Blunt/penetrating trauma, fractures and traumatic amputations This fact sheet is part of a series of materials developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on blast injuries.
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Copied from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Website. Accessed February 24, 2009 from http://emergency.cdc.gov/masscasualties/blastinjuryf acts.asp Blast Injuries: Prehospital Care Background Because a terrorist bombing can cause a large number of seriously injured persons, prehospital care systems play a critical role in managing the emergency medical response to this kind of mass casualty event. The quality of prehospital emergency medical response will affect the quality of all subsequent clinical care activities, and it may directly affect patient mortality and morbidity rates. The complexity and scope of a mass casualty event caused by an explosion requires that prehospital emergency medical care systems address the following issues: Recognition of specific hazards associated with a terrorist bombing, such as secondary devices, environmental hazards (e.g., toxins, fires) and structural instability. Identification patients with significant blast related injuries.
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2011 for the course NURS 504 taught by Professor Culley during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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BLAST INJURIES - C opied from the Centers for Disease...

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