NUCLEAR WEAPONS SEPT 2010

NUCLEAR WEAPONS SEPT 2010 - S. R. DiNardi, Ph.D., CIH...

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Unformatted text preview: S. R. DiNardi, Ph.D., CIH University of Massachusetts, Amherst Professor and Chair Emeritus School of Public Health and Health Sciences & Adjunct Professor of Public Health at USC Nuclear Explosion Examples http://shock.military.com/Shock/videos.do?d isplayContent=218301 Nuclear Detonation in Washington, DC http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doQY4xR XJJ4 The energy released in a nuclear explosion derives from the splitting (fission) of radioactive materials, e.g. Uranium-235 and Plutonium-239. Bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan at the end of World War II are examples of nuclear explosions. The explosive energy from a nuclear detonation is quantified in terms of the number of kilotons (Kt) of the conventional explosive TNT (trinitrotoluene) that it would take to create the same blast effect. Dr. Culley will discuss blast injuries later this semester During and following a nuclear explosion, radiation is released including Electromagnetic radiation : ultraviolet, infrared, visible, gamma and x-ray Particulate radiation: alpha and beta particles, and neutrons A nuclear blast releases massive amounts of energy, which dissipate as a fireball , blast forces/waves , prompt radiation , light and heat (thermal energy) , and delayed ionizing radiation (i.e. fallout: nuclear fragments created (i....
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NUCLEAR WEAPONS SEPT 2010 - S. R. DiNardi, Ph.D., CIH...

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