HPEB_335_lessons_22_29

HPEB_335_lessons_22_29 - Lesson 22: Bleeding AMERICAN RED...

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Unformatted text preview: Lesson 22: Bleeding AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 2 Introduction Bleeding is the escape of blood from the arteries, capillaries or veins. Bleeding occurs internally or externally. Uncontrolled bleeding, whether internal or external, is life threatening. Blood is made up of liquid (plasma) and solid components (white and red blood cells and platelets). Blood Transports oxygen, nutrients and wastes. Protects against disease. Maintains constant body temperature. AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 3 Introduction (continued) The three major types of blood vessels are Arteries. Capillaries. Veins. Blood in the arteries travels faster and under greater pressure. Blood in the arteries pulses with each contraction of the heart. Bleeding that is severe enough to critically reduce blood volume is life threatening because tissues will die from lack of oxygen. AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 4 External Bleeding External bleeding occurs when a blood vessel is opened externally, such as a tear in the skin. Each type of blood vessel bleeds differently. Arterial bleeding is rapid and, if severe, is life threatening. The blood is bright red in color. Venous blood is under less pressure and flows from the wound at a steady rate. The blood is dark red in color. Capillary bleeding is usually slow because the vessels are small. Blood oozes from the wound. AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 5 External Bleeding (continued) Signals of severe external bleeding include Blood spurting from the wound. Bleeding that fails to stop after all measures have been taken to control it. AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 6 Care for External Bleeding Apply direct pressure. Apply a pressure bandage. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number. Continue to monitor the airway and breathing. AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AIDRESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 7 Closing Check for severe bleeding while checking life-threatening conditions. Care for external bleeding includes Direct pressure....
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HPEB_335_lessons_22_29 - Lesson 22: Bleeding AMERICAN RED...

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