HPEB_335_lessons_36_42

HPEB_335_lessons_36_42 - Lesson 36: Reaching and Moving...

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Lesson 36: Reaching and Moving Victims in the Water
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 2 Introduction Water provides people with some of the most enjoyable recreational activities, but water can be dangerous. Drowning is death by suffocation in water. Drownings may occur during swimming, boating, hunting, fishing or while taking a bath.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 3 The Risk of Drowning Children younger than age 5 and young adults ages 15 to 24 have the highest rates of drowning.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 4 Preventing Aquatic Emergencies The best thing anyone can do to stay safe in, on and around the water is to learn to swim. The American Red Cross has swimming courses for people of any age and swimming ability. To enroll in a swimming course, contact a local Red Cross chapter.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 5 Preventing Aquatic Emergencies (continued) Follow these guidelines whenever you are swimming in any body of water (pools, lakes, ponds, quarries, canals, rivers or oceans): Always swim with a buddy; never swim alone. Read and obey all rules and posted signs. Swim in areas supervised by a lifeguard. Children or inexperienced swimmers should take extra precautions, such as wearing a U.S. Coast Guard- approved life jacket when around the water.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 6 Preventing Aquatic Emergencies (continued) Watch out for the “dangerous too’s”: Too tired Too cold Too far away from safety Too much sun Too much strenuous activity Be knowledgeable of the water environment and the potential hazards. Know how to prevent, recognize and respond to emergencies.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 7 Preventing Aquatic Emergencies (continued) Use a feet-first entry when entering the water. Enter head-first only when the area is clearly marked for diving and has no obstruction. Do not mix alcohol with swimming, diving or boating.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS FIRST AID–RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES FOURTH EDITION Copyright © 2006 by The American National Red Cross All rights reserved. 8
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HPEB_335_lessons_36_42 - Lesson 36: Reaching and Moving...

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