Arabs - People of Arab Heritage Macro Aspects of Model...

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People of Arab Heritage
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Macro Aspects of Model Global society Impact of 9/11/2001 Community Family Person Health
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Overview, Inhabited Localities, Topography Heritage and Residence Nomadic desert tribes of Arabian  Peninsula, from 22 countries Great diversity Migration and Economics First wave: 1890-1910s mostly  Christians, settled in northeast US  cities, mostly from Syria, economic  reasons
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Overview, Inhabited Localities, Topography Migration and Economics Second wave: >1965 mostly Muslims,  settled in midwest & west cities,  political reasons from countries  afflicted with war, ethnic identity,  mostly Sunnis, if from Iraq, Shi’ite
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Overview, Inhabited Localities, Topography Educational Status and  Occupations Value professions and hence  education Literacy rates vary US born prosperous, foreign born  unemployed and poor
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Communication Language and dialects Arabic, Modern and colloquial Some only read Arabic but speak  own language, i.e. Armenian Repetition, gesturing Difficulties in health care situations Contextual use of the language High, many nuances
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Communication Cultural patterns Value privacy, resist divulging  personal info to stranger “Maalesh”, i.e. never mind Mediation Loud voice – indicates importance or  anger Avoids show of disagreement Use same sex interpreters
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Communication Touch and spatial distance Stand close together Touch only same sex Eye contact and greetings Maintain Use hand shakes & cheek kisses Time and temporality Predestination, “inshallah”, not future  oriented Non-chalant in time except in business  and profession
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Communication Greetings Before business Names Use of titles “Um (mother), Abu (father)” plus 1 st   name of eldest son Personal Space 10-12 inches c same sex
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Family Roles and Organization Head of Household and Gender  Roles Patrilineal, father in power, children  subservient to elders, females to  males Clear gender roles, complimentary Female modesty in dress, “hijab”
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Family Roles and Organization Prescriptive, Restrictive & Taboo 
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