French Canadian Heritage

French Canadian Heritage - People of French Canadian...

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People of French Canadian Heritage Overview Quebec The "Quiet Revolution" *Period of dramatic social and political change *Nationalization of Hydro-electric companies *Pro-Sovereignty movement The "Quiet Revolution" *Terrorism – 1963 thru 1970 *October Crisis *Charter of the French Language – Bill 101 The "Quiet Revolution" *Lévesque and the Parti Québécois *Distancing Quebec from rest of Canada *1980 Quebec referendum *Kitchen Accord *New Constitution Heritage *Metis *Acadians *Francophones Education and Occupations *50% of Francophones don’t finish HS *Traditional Occupations *Well represent in all trades and professions. Dominant Language and Dialects *2 Official Languages - 1969 *Regional difference *Joual *Francophones declining outside Quebec and increasingly fragmented. Language and Health in Francophones *Health status poorer *~50% little or no access to health services in French *Cultural Heritage remains even after language use declines. Cultural Communication Patterns *High Voice Crescendos anger or violence *Volume = Importance and Emotion
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*Encourage sharing thoughts and feelings *Acadians more reserved *Spatial distance less; more touching *Shaking Hands recommended for Health Professionals Temporal Relationships *Slow to build *Very important and enduring *Commitment and responsibility expected *Quebec Francophones balance past, present and future orientations. *Rural Francophones present oriented, accepting and fatalistic. Format for Names *Until late 1970’s wives took husband’s and children took father’s surnames. *In Quebec, women keep maiden name *In other Provinces, any combination of names may be used for wife and children. Gender Roles *Traditionally, men were moral authority, bread-winner, purveyor of affection and security.
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course NURS 226 taught by Professor Fuller during the Spring '09 term at South Carolina.

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French Canadian Heritage - People of French Canadian...

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