iraniancul08ba_1

Iraniancul08ba_1 - Iranian Culture Iranian Abbas S Tavakoli DrPH MPH ME Culture Culture s Culture is sum of beliefs habits likes dislikes norms

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Unformatted text preview: Iranian Culture Iranian Abbas S. Tavakoli DrPH, MPH, ME Culture Culture s Culture is sum of beliefs, habits, likes, dislikes, norms, customs, rituals and so forth that we learned from our families during the years of socialization. (Spector, 2004, p.9) Ethnicity Ethnicity Ethnicity is that of “a group of people that share a common and distinctive racial, national, religious, linguistic, or cultural heritage”. (" Office of Minority Health”, cited in Spector, 2004, p.11) Ethnicity Ethnicity Ethnicity influences responses to pain, definition of seriousness and health care utilization patterns. Ethnicity influences disease rates, health maintenance and home treatment, and illness behavior. Religion Religion s Religion “the belief in a divine or superhuman power to be obeyed and worshipped as a creator (s) and ruler(s) of the universe”. (Office of Minority Health, Spector, 2004, p.12) Who are the Iranian’s Who s s s The Iranian peoples are cousins to Americans of The European descent; extremely distant cousins, but nevertheless one in origin. More than six thousand years ago the peoples now More living in Europe, Iran and India spoke one common language. There are no historical examples of that language extant (writing had not yet been invented), but we do know from linguistic evidence that these people all came from one original stock and spoke one common language, Indo-European. common Today, the official language of Iran is Persian, or as it Today, is called in Persian, "Farsi." Persian is an Indois European language, and is distantly related to English. European Persian is one of the richest literary languages in the world, especially where poetry is concerned. world especially Population (July 2006 estimate: 68,688,433) Growth rate 1.1% Life Expectancy 70.3 The UN :Iran’s population will reach 99 million in 2025. 37% < 15 yrs *Over 1 million Iranians live in the US. Land Area Land 1,648,195 square kilometers (631,660 square miles) Iranian Heritage Iranian s Iranian are proud of their heritage. Iranian Persian culture is very old and rich. It includes the Zoroastrian religion and some of the world’s greatest poets and leaders in medieval philosophy, astronomy, and medicine; e.g., the physician Ibn Sina (Avicenna). Sina Literacy 79.4%(2003) 79.4%(2003) Ethnicity/Race: Persian 51% Azerbaijani 24% Kurd 7% Mazandarani 8 % Mazandarani Arab 3% Arab Lur 2% Baloch 2% Turkmen 2% Turkmen Other 1% Other Languages 58% 26% 9% 1% 2% 1% 1% 2% Religions Religions Islam 98% (89% Shi’a) s Zoroastrian, Jewish, and Christian 2% s Iranian Holidays Iranian s Religion • Ex. Prophet Mohammad Birthday s Iranian Iranian • Ex. Norouz (Iranian New Years) Prophet Muhammad’s Birthday Prophet 12th of Rabi'-ul-Awwal 12th s Commemorated with recollections of Commemorated Muhammad's life and significance s Iranian’s decorate their homes, prepare Iranian’s food, and share stories and poems s Also called Mawild Also s Noruz Noruz s s s s March 21 – Fixed date Iranian New Year’s Prepare a month in advance • Spring cleaning, buy new clothes & Spring flowers flowers Celebration consists of families visiting Celebration elders, extended family, friends, the resting places of the deceased, and giving gifts to the sick and poor gifts Noruz Noruz s On the 1st day… • Families gather around a table and wait for Families spring to begin. They then exchange gifts. spring • Some families read the Qur’an while they wait • Sweets are given out to everyone symbolizing Sweets the sweetening of their lives for the rest of the year • A mirror is passed around, rose water is mirror sprinkled and an incense is burnt to keep the evil eye away • Families go and visit their eldest family Families member member Noruz Noruz s Over the next 12 days… • Families travel to different houses Families and make short visits and • Each home always has a big supply Each of pastries, cookies, fresh /dried fruits and special nuts to serve to guests • Some people live far away from each Some other so a big party is usually held in the middle of these friends and family the Noruz Noruz s On the 13th day…Sizdah Bedar • Families go outside and have a picnic Families where they sing and dance and play. where • The 13th day is believed to be unlucky The and by going out into nature they are free from misfortune • The picnic ends with the setting of the The sun • Most families believe that how this Most celebration goes will portray how your Haft Sin Haft s s s Tradition which is set out at the beginning of Tradition Noruz Noruz Contains seven specific items all beginning Contains with the letter ‘S’ on a table symbolically corresponding to the seven creations and the seven holy immortals protecting them seven • Example: Sabzeh (wheat or barley) is set out to symbolize rebirth On the thirteenth day it is thrown out under On running water to exorcise the demons from their house Haft Sin Haft Food Practices Food s Usual meal pattern s Food beliefs and rituals s Usual diet s Fluids s Food prohibitions s Food prescriptions The cuisine of Iran is very diverse. Different types of foods are prepared for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. In Iran, a big portion of the food is eaten at lunch. Dinner is eaten at a much later time and the portion is a great deal smaller. Iranian cuisine is very unique; it can be described as diverse, distinct, and exotic. diverse, Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast is normally served from 6 to 9am s Typically Iranians will enjoy pita bread or other flat breads, feta cheese, and fresh fruits such as cucumber, boiled eggs, creamy yogurt, tomatoes, and fruit jams s Other breakfast favorites include pastries filled with dates, omelets and other egg dishes, bananas and melons. s Lunch This is the largest meal of the day and is served between noon and 2pm. s Lunch usually consists of Khoresht (a curry made of meat or chicken in a thick sauce plus vegetables or fruits, or nuts or legumes with Iranian spices and herbs) s Other items served during lunch include soup, salad, an appetizer, fruit, and yogurt. s Dinner Dinner s Dinner is a fairly light meal that is served later in the evening (around 9 or 10) and sometimes even midnight! s Leftovers are a common item for dinner, as well as salad, soup, yogurt, and fruit Presentation Presentation s s s s s This culture has a very refined taste and flavor, not only of the food itself, but also the presentation of the food. The fragrance the food gives off is almost as important as the taste of the food. Presentation is always a key factor in making an Iranian meal extravagant. A traditional table setting involves a table cloth, also known as a sofreh. This sofreh is spread over a rug or table. The main course of the meal is set in the center. Surrounding the main dishes are the smaller dishes, known as mokhalafat, such as appetizers, bread, and condiments. Hospitality s Hospitality is very important in the Iranian culture. s The guest is always the top priority and the top person in the house s When eating dinner while a guest is in the house, the host or hostess will never sit at the head of the table. History of immigration of Iranian to the US. Iranian s 1950-1970 s 1970-1978 s 1979-present Educational status and occupation occupation sIranian are among the most highly educated immigrant group in the US. s61% of Iranian heads of households claimed to be self-employed in 1987,1988. sOnly 10% reported employment in blue-collar jobs. Birth rituals/care of the new mother/baby Pregnancy care s Labor practices role of the laboring woman during birth s Role of the father and other family members during birth process s Vaginal vs. cesarean section s Breastfeeding s s Male circumcision Death rituals s Preparation s Home vs. hospital s Special needs s Care of the body s Attitudes toward organ donation s Attitudes toward autopsy Death Rituals s Rituals & expectations • • • • • • Muslim views on life support Deathbed faces Mecca May request burial in Iran Death bath given by a Muslim non-Muslim HCP wear gloves Autopsy allowed Death Rituals s Responses to death & grief • • • • Open loud expression View death as a beginning not end 3rd, 7th, & 40th day and anniversary Wear black Family relationships s Composition/structure s Decision making s Spokesperson s Gender issues s Caring role s Expectations of and for elders s Expectations of visitors Spiritual/religious orientation s Primary religious orientation s Usual religious/spiritual practices s Use of spiritual healing/healers Health Care Practices s Responsibility for health care • Seek help rapidly, may shop around • Herbal remedies • Self-medicate with drugs from Iran • Emphasize family-care rather than self-care Health Care Practices s Folk practices • Herbal remedies with meds s Barriers • Language • Finances, no insurance Cultural Differences Cultural s Western industrialized cultures emphasize schedules and the planning of events around separate and distinct blocks of time. s Iranian culture, conversely, emphasizes people, human relationships, family ties, togetherness and attending to things based on priority of importance rather than according to schedule. Navid and Farid Navid Myself and My Wife Myself Myself and Kids/Norouz Pictute Myself My wife and Kids My The Iranian Wedding… The Iranian Wedding… Persepolis (100 Pillar Palace), Marvdasht Persepolis Persepolis, Marvdasht Persepolis, Koorush Shrine, Pasargadae, Marvdasht Koorush Persepolis, Marvdasht Persepolis, Persepolis, Marvdasht Persepolis, Golestan Palace, Tehran Golestan Ganj Nameh Inscriptions, Hamadan Hamadan Ali Qapoo Palace, Esfahan Ali Chehel Sotune Palace, Esfahan Chehel Menar Jonban Minaret, Esfahan Menar Sheikh Lotf Ol-Lah Mosque, Esfahan Sheikh Si-o-Seh Pol Bistoon Inscription, Kermanshah Bistoon Bam Citadel, Bam Bam Bam Citadel, Bam Bam Vank Church, Esfahan Vank Paintings of Chehel Sotune Palace, Esfahan Esfahan Imam Reza Shrine, Mashad Imam Goharshad Mosque, Mashad Goharshad Saint Stepanous Church, Jolfa Saint Desert (Kavir) Desert Orumieh Lake Orumieh Persian Gulf Persian Natural Landscape of Persian Gulf Coast Natural Caspian Sea Caspian Talesh Tribes Talesh Moaraq Painting, Tehran Moaraq Traditional dressing of Shahsavan Tribe Woman Tribe Traditional dressing of Baluch Woman Traditional Traditional dressing of Khorasan Woman Traditional Qezelbash Girl, Tribes Qezelbash Golden Marlik Cup (Late 2nd Mill B.C.) Golden Qezelbash Girl Qezelbash Qashqaei Tribes Qashqaei Tribal Handicraft Tribal Women Taking Water Women Turkaman Tribes Turkaman Baluch girl on Decampment Baluch Bakhtiyari Tribes Bakhtiyari Ardabil Shahsavan Tribes Ardabil Ardabil Shahsavan Tribes Ardabil Qashqaei Tribes Qashqaei Handicrafts (Giveh), Kermanshah Handicrafts Ardabil Shahsavan Tribes Ardabil Kord Tribes Kord Oldmen of Kurdestan, Sanandaj City Oldmen Baking Bread Baking Iranian women clap as they attend a rally to celebrate International Woman's Day in March 8, 2004 file photo. photo. A Silk & Wool Baluch Persian Rug Silk Harvest of Tea, Lahijan Harvest Pistachio, Damqan Pistachio, Saffron Saffron The most precious and most The expensive spice in the world expensive things that truly is worth its weight in gold things The Saffron filaments, or threads, are actually the dried stigmas of the saffron flower, Each flower contains The only three stigmas. These threads must be picked from each flower by hand, and more than 75,000 of these flowers are needed to produce just one pound of Saffron filaments. Saffron is one Saffron of the few Darvazeh Dolat (Dolat Gate) Darvazeh Ghar (Ghar Gate) Darvazeh Doushan (Doushan Gate) Darvazeh Shabdolazim (Shabdolazim Gate) Famous old City Gates – Tehran, Iran Dervazeh Shemiran 19th Centuray Horse Vagon Old Modes of Transportation – Tehran, Iran Tehran Parliament-Majles Shoraye Meli Ferdous Printing Toupkhaneh Square Old Famous Buildings – Tehran, Iran Ghavamosalta neh adio Iran1947 Sepahsalar Mosque City Hall (Shahrdary) Old Hotel Old Famous Buildings – Tehran, Iran Moghberodouleh Square Saadi St. / 1951 Old Sarband-1961 Istanbul St./1947 Lalehzar St./1947 Old Famous Streets – Tehran, Iran Naser Khosro Baharestan-Tehran--1946 Naderi St. Ferdousi Square Old Famous Streets – Tehran, Iran Qazvin Gate Shahreza St Old Famous Streets – Tehran, Iran Darvazeh Tehran – Tehran Gate, Iran Shahyad Square / Tehran Symbol Monument –Modern Tehran, Iran Damavand Peak Near Tehran, Iran Biggest Clock in the World Modern Tehran Monuments–Iran Metro Tehran Buildings–Iran Modern Tehran Buildings–Iran Tehran Symphonic Orchestra Site Seeing ­ Modern Tehran,Iran Tehran Symphonic Orchestra Site Seeing ­ Modern Tehran,Iran Site Seeing ­ Modern Tehran,Iran Modern Tehran Parliament,Iran Biggest Clock in the World Liberty Stadium – Tehran,Iran Biggest Clock in the World Tehran University,Iran Biggest Clock in the World An Art Gallery in Modern Tehran ­ Iran International Fair Centre Milad Tower Modern Tehran –Iran Modern Tehran Streets –Iran Vanak Square, Tehran, Iran. Modern Tehran –Iran Modern Tehran Winter Sky Resorts–Iran Modern Tehran Winter Sky Resorts–Iran Modern Tehran –Iran Modern Tehran Parks–Iran Boustan Mall Modern Tehran –Iran Tehran Airport–Iran Metro Tehran –Iran Metro Tehran –Iran Resalat Tunnel ­ Tehran –Iran Tekyeh_Dowlat ­ Golestan Palace– Tehran, Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16­19th) Shams Emarh­Golestan Palace asieh_facade­Golestan Palace ory Building­Golestan Palace Golestan Palace– Tehran, Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16­19th) Golestan Palace / Tehran ­ Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16-19th) Golestan Palace / Tehran ­ Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16-19th) Golestan Palace / Tehran ­ Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16-19th) Golestan Palace / Tehran ­ Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16-19th) Golestan Palace / Tehran ­ Iran (Historic Building/Museum 16-19th) Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Inside Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Inside Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Inside Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Inside Aliqapoe Palace Music Room – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Siose Pol (33 bridges) – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Siose Pol (33 bridges) – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Pole Khajoo (Khajoo Bridge) – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Pole Khajoo (Khajoo Bridge) – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Chel Sotun, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) 40 Columns Building – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) 40 Columns Building – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) 40 Columns Building – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) 40 Columns Building – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Sheikh Lotfolah Mosque – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Sheikh Lotfolah Mosque – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Sheikh Lotfolah Mosque – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Shah Mosque – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Shah Mosque (Naghshe Jahan Square / Image of Universe Square – Shah Mosque (Naghshe Jahan Square / Image of Universe Square – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Shah Mosque (Naghshe Jahan Square / Image of Universe Square – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Chahar Bagh (four Gardens) Building – Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Hasht Behesht ( Eight Heavens Building )– Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Hasht Behesht ( Eight Heavens Building )– Isfehan, Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Menar Jonban (Mysterious Moving Towers) – Isfehan Iran (Safavid era- 1500-1700) Old Bazar – Isfehan, Iran Shah Abasi Hotel – Isfehan, Iran Shah Abasi Hotel – Isfehan, Iran Vanak Church – Isfehan, Iran Vanak Church Bethlehem Cathedral– Isfehan, Iran Vanak Church Bethlehem Cathedral– Isfehan, Iran Ancient Zoroastrian Temple – Near Isfehan, Iran Any Comments or Questions Any s ????? ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course NURS 226 taught by Professor Fuller during the Spring '09 term at South Carolina.

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