probability-1 - -Uniformly Distributed Random Variables...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Review of Probability Probability is a statement about the population , not individuals in the population. P(A)=the proportion of times that A occurs if the random experiment is run many times . There are several rules, found on your yellow card, including:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Probability Rules
Background image of page 2
Probability Rules
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Probability Rules Venn Diagrams from: http://www.cs.uni.edu/~campbell/stat/venn.html
Background image of page 4
Other Points Using a two-way table can help answer conditional probability questions. The total probability of the sample space is 1. This can be helpful to check your tree diagram or two-way table.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Probability Questions What is the smallest a probability can be? What is the largest a probability can be? Are “independent” events and “disjoint” events the same?
Background image of page 6
Random Variables We have studied several types of random variables: - Discrete Random Variables - Binomial Random Variables - Normally Distributed Random Variables
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: -Uniformly Distributed Random Variables Discrete Random Variables These variables take discrete values, and no values in between. These are often summarized in table form. To find the expected value, multiply each possible value by its probability, and add all the resulting numbers. Useful fact to remember: Total probability of all possibilities must equal 1. Binomial Random Variables Binomial experiments meet the following criteria:-There are n trials. This number is determined in advance.-There are two possible outcomes for each trial, often called “success” and “failure.”-The outcomes are independent from one trial to the next.-The probability (p) of a success remains the same from one trial to the next. A binomial random variable is defined as X where X=# of successes in n trials of a binomial experiment....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course STATS 250 taught by Professor Gunderson during the Spring '10 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 9

probability-1 - -Uniformly Distributed Random Variables...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online