InfluenzaW11topost-1 - Lecture 8 February 3 Todays Outline...

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Lecture 8 February 3 Today’s Outline How do new flu viruses emerge? Flu pandemic of 1918 Last year’s “Scare” and what’s here this year Announcements
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How Do New Flu Viruses Emerge? Antigenic Drift vs. Antigenic Shift
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Antigenic Drift When a virus replicates itself, errors are introduced leading to variants of the virus The change is steady, but gradual The virus you pass on may not be the same as the one that infected you
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Antigenic Shift
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Antigenic Shift Double infection by different viral subtypes can lead to swapping of RNA Leads to sudden, wholesale change in virus May lead to combination which is more (or less) virulent Can cause instantaneous loss of immunity for entire population
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Why we need a new flu vaccine each year
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Avian Influenza Clinical Focus, p. 371
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New strains every 10-30 years responsible for past pandemics (usually caused by shift) In intervening years (every 2-3yrs) new strains usually caused by drift
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Past Pandemics Name of pandemic Date Deaths Subtype Asiatic Flu 1889-90 1 million H2N2 (?) Spanish Flu 1918-20 40 million H1N1 Asian Flu 1957-58 1 to 1.5 million H2N2 Hong Kong Flu 1968-69 3/4 to 1 million H3N2
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Influenza Pandemic of 1918 “The First Wave” (spring 1918)
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First recorded case most likely an army recruit at Ft. Riley, Kansas (camp Funston located here). March 11th Deceptive because military and prison kept best records 100 patients by noon, 500 in a week Disease strikes more people than usual, but is not super deadly
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course BIOLOGY 118 taught by Professor Spillane during the Winter '10 term at University of Michigan.

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InfluenzaW11topost-1 - Lecture 8 February 3 Todays Outline...

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