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Lecture Notes - handles info about memory and emotion A...

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Hippocampus & Memory
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I. Types of Memory A. Declarative (Explicit) – facts or events 1. Episodic – when and where of your life happenings; autobiographical 2. Semantic – persons knowledge about the world; facts B. Non-declarative (Implicit) – no conscious recollection; procedural memory (motor skills)
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II. Hippocampus General role – memory consolidation A. Hippocampal dependent (to some degree) Episodic, semantic, spatial, associative (trace conditioning), single-item, recognition, and familiarity A. Hippocampal independent non-declarative (implicit), delay conditioning, motor skills (procedural memory)
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II. Hippocampus A. Regions – CA1-CA3 (hippocampus proper) B. Hippocampal formation – CA1-CA3, dentate gyrus, subiculum C. Associated areas – entorhinal cortex D. Main input – perforant path (from entorhinal and perirhinal cortex) E. Main output – cingulum bundle and fimbria/fornix
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III. Hippocampus & Depression Hip part of limbic system – emotion Q: Why is it helpful to have an area that
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Unformatted text preview: handles info about memory and emotion? A: Quick consolidation of emotional events into memory. I.e. events that could be biologically very important. III. Cont. A. Biological correlates of depression 1. Decreased BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) 2. Neurotransmitter deficiency (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine) 3. Decreased hippocampal volume a. SSRI’s (Prozac) can restore hippocampal volume III. Cont. b. One symptom of depression is cognitive impairment (i.e. problems with memory, concentration, decision making) c. Rats with learned helplessness are slower to learn III. Cont. B. What causes loss of hippocampal volume? 1. Decrease in neurogenesis 2. Corticosteroid overexposure (released during stress)-Hip indirectly responsible for modulation of stress hormone release -Correlation bet severity of cognitive impairment and cortisol levels -Corticosteroid exposure can cause short-term memory deficits...
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