Design Day 2 - THEA 200 Design and Designers(pt 2 Who are...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THEA 200 Design and Designers (pt 2)
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Who are we talking about? Set Designer Costume Designer Lighting Designer Sound Designer Support the Overall Production (Concept, tone/mood, emphasis, etc.) Support the actors Evoke an emotional response and what do they do?
Image of page 2
For each designer, we’ll answer the following: What are you trying to do? Things to consider as you begin What are your tools? What are the steps to completing your design?
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Set Design: What are you trying to do? Define the performance space Design and implement a good ground plan Send the audience a message about how to understand the story, characters, theme, etc.
Image of page 4
Defining the Performance Space QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. See how the floor is painted - this defines the space The placement of the bench also tells us that the main action of the scene will take place here
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Defining the Performance Space cont. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. In defining the space, the designer creates opportunities for compelling staging, as with the use of levels, here.
Image of page 6
Different Performance Spaces QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Image of page 8
QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stage Alley or “Tennis Court” Audience Audience QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Image of page 10
Stage Stage Stage Audience Seating Audience Seating “Environmental” Stage
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Extreme Environmental Theatre Really more of a performance. Philippe Petit tight roping between the World Trade Center Towers in the 1970’s
Image of page 12
Design and implement a good ground plan Ground plan = placement of set pieces in space
Image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Visibility Possibilities for staging and movement of scenery if called for Variety Pays attention to the specific needs of the text (ex. Hamlet needs to jump in a grave in Act 4) Helps tell the story of the play What makes a good ground plan?
Image of page 14
Things to Consider Given Circumstances - Time, place, social standing How many settings/locations/spaces? Sight lines of the theatre Technology available How will things move? What will they be made of? “Special” things the set needs to do, special things the actors need to do on the set, details that are key to the production. Budget and Schedule Style/Concept of the show
Image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What are your tools?
Image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern