Late Greek and Roman Theatre

Late Greek and Roman Theatre - Late Greek, Early Rome THEA...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Late Greek, Early Rome THEA 200 Seneca cannot be too heavy nor Plautus too light… Polonius, Hamlet , 2.2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
534 B.C 500 B.C 400 B.C 336 B.C 100 B.C Theatre in Ancient Greece - Timeline First Record of theatre in Greece Extant (existing) Dramas Aristotle’s Poetics Hellenistic Period Classical Period/ Athenian Golden Age of Drama Increasing Roman Influence on Theatre
Background image of page 2
Peloponnesian War - 402 B.C. Greeks surrender to Sparta in 402 B.C. Spartans did not have the same interest in high culture Shut down democracy for a time Censored theatre - benign comedy substituted for biting political satire QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Alexander the Great (356 - 323 BCE) Alexander took over all of the Greek city-states and folded them into a single government THEN, he begins to conquer Sets up a new capitol in Egypt (Alexandria) Decline of the polis and a move toward common culture Egypt is the cultural center - not Greece Young and ambitious Greeks emigrate to Alexandria QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Background image of page 4
Alexander’s Empire
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hellenistic Period - Theatre Plays were exported all over the Empire Theatre is not just for church anymore - plays are performed at civic and military events Less tragedy, more comedy No more satyr plays Chorus is still around, but loses importance Shift towards emphasis on feeling, emotion, spectacle and melodrama Costumes and masks become larger and more lavish as well
Background image of page 6
New Comedy New Comedy = Hellenistic comedy Domestic tales of middle class life interrupted with songs Comedy was popular, but lost its political edge Many fragments of plays survive, but only one complete New Comedy The Grumbler by Menander (aka The Grouch or Old Cantakerous ) By the way, Menander wrote over 100 plays…we have 1.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Aristotle…one more time Aristotle was Alexander the Great’s teacher He was also Plato’s student Wrote The Poetics c. 330 BCE Probably in response to Plato’s condemnation of theatre Rediscovered in 1498 Aristotle interested in theatre provoking catharsis = the purgation of pity and fear
Background image of page 8
Theatres QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. The Theatre at Epidaurus - the Best preserved Greek Theatre
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 37

Late Greek and Roman Theatre - Late Greek, Early Rome THEA...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online