model_guidelines

Model_guidelines - carefully Destroy contact sheets test strips negatives work prints and files when no longer needed Children and minors make

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1-06 Guidelines for Photographing People Photographing live subjects is a lot of fun, but it requires an amount of care and respect. Proceed with thoughtfulness to all subjects involved. Know your rights and responsibilities whether you are behind or in front of the camera. Don't exploit. Don't be exploited. • Use professional models whenever possible. • Don't be alone. Have at least one other person at the photo session. Choose that person based on their ability to respect the model and put them at ease. • Get a model release. Spell out purpose of session, how photos will be used. Stick to it. Spell out recompense. Deliver in a timely manner. Put it in writing. • Don't touch the model. Ask, or get an assistant to touch up. • Don't coerce. • For sensitive subjects, handle photos in a PRIVATE lab or on PRVATE computer. Label and store
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Unformatted text preview: carefully. Destroy contact sheets, test strips, negatives, work prints, and files when no longer needed. Children and minors make great subjects, but be very sure you have permission from their parent or guardian to photograph them. Nude and semi-nude photography are special genres to be treated with special care. If you choose to engage in this high-risk behavior, protect yourself and your photo subjects by following the guidelines above. If you are careless with your subjects or your images, you may hurt feelings, incur lawsuits, lose jobs and relationships, and cause embarrassment all around. If you are asked to be a model, ask questions first. It's your right. If there are things you won’t do, say so up front. No matter who it is and how much you trust them, take precautions. Put the agreement in writing. It's OK to JUST SAY NO....
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course JOUR 537 taught by Professor Mcgill during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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