Second Treatise of Government (John Locke)

Second Treatise of Government (John Locke) - Second...

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Unformatted text preview: Second Treatise of Government John Locke Copyright 20102015 All rights reserved. Jonathan Bennett [Brackets] enclose editorial explanations. Small dots enclose material that has been added, but can be read as though it were part of the original text. Occasional bullets, and also indenting of passages that are not quotations, are meant as aids to grasping the structure of a sentence or a thought. Every four-point ellipsis . . . . indicates the omission of a brief passage that seems to present more difficulty than it is worth.-The division into numbered sections is Lockes. First launched: January 2005 Last amended: March 2008 Contents Preface 1 Chapter 1 2 Chapter 2: The state of nature 3 Chapter 3: The state of war 7 Chapter 4: Slavery 9 Chapter 5: Property 10 Chapter 6: Paternal power 19 Chapter 7: Political or Civil Society 26 Second Treatise John Locke Chapter 8: The beginning of political societies 32 Chapter 9: The purposes of political society and government 40 Chapter 10: The forms of a commonwealth 42 Chapter 11: The extent of the legislative power 43 Chapter 12: The legislative, executive, and federative powers of the commonwealth 46 Chapter 13: The subordination of the powers of the commonwealth 48 Chapter 14: Prerogative 53 Chapter 15: Paternal, political, and despotic power, considered together 56 Chapter 16: Conquest 58 Chapter 17: Usurpation 65 Chapter 18: Tyranny 65 Chapter 19: The dissolution of government 70 Locke on children 80 Second Treatise John Locke Preface Preface to the two Treatises Reader, you have here the beginning and the end of a two-part treatise about government. It isnt worthwhile to go into what happened to the pages that should have come in between (they were more than half the work). [The missing pages, that were to have been included in the Second Treatise , i.e. the second part of the two-part treatise, were simply lost . They contained an extended attack on Sir Robert Filmers Patriarcha , a defence of the divine right of kings, published in 1680 (Filmer had died in 1653). The lost pages presumably overlapped the attack on the same target that filled Lockes First Treatise of Government and also occupy a good deal of space in the Second .] These surviving pages, I hope, are sufficient to establish the throne of our great restorer, our present King William; to justify his title to the throne on the basis of the consent of the people , which is the only lawful basis for government, and which he possesses more fully and clearly than any other ruler in the Christian world; and to justify to the world the people of England, whose love of their just and natural rights, and their resolve to preserve them, saved this nation when it was on the brink of slavery and ruin under King James II. If these pages are as convincing as I flatter myself that they are, the missing pages will be no great loss, and my reader can be satisfied without them. I certainly hope so, because I dont expect to havethem....
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2011 for the course POLSC 100 taught by Professor Wallach during the Spring '11 term at CUNY Hunter.

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Second Treatise of Government (John Locke) - Second...

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