tropics10-africa2-1

tropics10-africa2-1 - The Human Development Index (HDI) is...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Human Development Index ( HDI ) is an index combining normalized measures of life expectancy , literacy , educational attainment , and GDP per capita for countries worldwide. It is claimed as a standard means of measuring human development — a concept that, according to the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), refers to the process of widening the options of persons, giving them greater opportunities for education, health care, income, employment, etc. The basic use of HDI is to rank countries by level of "human development", which usually also implies to determine whether a country is a developed , developing, or underdeveloped country .
Background image of page 2
High income = blue middle-high = green Middle-low = purple low = red
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Green = high (.75-.95 and over) Orange-yellow = middle (.50 - .749) Red = low (.35 and below - .499)
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
ca. 8000 B.P. Saharan ( cattle, goats, sheep )
Background image of page 8
Eastern Sahara Nabta Playa, Egypt ca. 8000 B.P. Plant Domestication?
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
After ca. 3000 BC Spread of Pastoral Neolithic & Farming (?) into Sahel/E Africa (Following Tsetse Fly-free regions)
Background image of page 10
WET DRY Modern Distribution of Tsetse Fly
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
African Plant Domesticates Biogeographic Distribution of wild ancestors of Domesticated African Plants suggests one broad region encompassing 3 Domestic Complexes Savanna complex: sorghum, African rice, peanuts, millets, watermelon Forest margin complex: millets, beans, robusta coffee, oil palm, yams Ethiopian complex: millet, tef, noog, arabica coffee, enset, chat Forest margin savanna Ethiopian
Background image of page 12
Root Crop Agriculture (yams) and Arboriculture (oil palm) in Tropical Forest and Woodland Areas of Western, Central, and Southern Africa (how old?, likely 2,000 to 1,000 BC or earlier) Continuation of Hunting and Gathering in some areas until historic times (trade and colonialism)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Yam “barn” in Nigeria forest region Oil palm
Background image of page 14
Abelam (Sepik River, New Guinea, decorated yams)
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Bantu, a large group of related peoples, originated in area of Cameroon and Nigeria and spread throughout central and southern Africa. Bantu peoples make up about a third of Africa's population. Bantu is the name of the language family spoken by these peoples. Over time, the Bantu-speaking peoples diversified and developed unique variations on the proto-culture of bantu peoples.
Background image of page 22
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 54

tropics10-africa2-1 - The Human Development Index (HDI) is...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 23. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online