reaction 2b - John E. Williams, Robert C. Satterwhite and...

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John E. Williams, Robert C. Satterwhite and Deborah L. Best used the Five Factor Model (FFM) to examine the pancultural gender stereotypes in 25 countries throughout the world, including the United States in their article, “Pancultural Gender Stereotypes Revisited: The Five Factor Model.” Though their research is very interesting and informative, there has a distinctive bias, mainly reflecting the male-associated items. In this essay, I will discuss the article’s failure to mention the size of the sample, male to female ratio and the large number of “not differentially associated by gender” adjectives missing. The first mistake of this piece is that it lacks basic research terms when discussing a study. It does not give the number of individuals who participated in the assessment. Without this key information, the research could be seen as bias because it is viewed as the researcher is hiding something and knows the sample is unfair and not an adequate representation of the population. The size of the sample is important in determine creditability. There is a huge difference between
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course ANT 2301 taught by Professor Gravlee during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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reaction 2b - John E. Williams, Robert C. Satterwhite and...

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