a-mediterranean2-comp1

a-mediterranean2-comp1 - The Mediterranean the worlds...

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The Mediterranean, the world’s largest inland sea, a land-locked body of salt-water with one natural outlet to Atlantic, linked many different cultures through contact and exchange
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The Bronze Age Bronze metallurgy spread rapidly through Europe, but only in the Aegean did state societies emerge in the Bronze Age Major Palace Civilizations of Bronze Age: Minoan (Island of Crete) Mycenaen (mainland Greece)
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Cyclades
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Cyclades , Greek islands known for their white marble and Early Bronze Age (3-2,000 BC) anthropomorphic marble figurines , which show artistic and everyday features that continue in later Aegean civilizations
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Minoan Civilization Label “Minoan” for the Cretan Bronze Age , coined by Arthur Evans who first excavated at palace of Knossos , was inspired by legendary King Minos Early Minoan or “Pre-palatial” period, ca. 3500-2000 BC, there is little evidence of social complexity in domestic and mortuary contexts Later Minoan broken into First palace period (2000-1700 BC) that saw the emergence of palace complexes at Knossos, Mallia, and Phaistos, which were reconstructed after destructive earthquakes , initiating the Second Palace period (1700-1490 BC).
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Palace at Knossos Typical palace contained: - large, open-air central court - ritual and entertainment spaces -painted frescoes
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Religious imagery in Minoan Crete included double axes and “horns of consecration,” women grasping snakes, and representations of bulls and bull leaping
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At the end of the Second Palace period on Crete, all but one of the palaces (Knossos) destroyed; Knossos survived but was inhabited by new administration, Linear B replaced earlier writing on the island Palace of Knossos
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Linear B Script Last of three Minoan scripts (hieroglyphic, Linear A, and Linear B), Linear B was used to record early Greek language , used at the end of the Second Palace Period
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Mycenae palace civilization in mainland Greece, ca. 3200-2600 BC Lerna, ca. 2300 BC
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course ANT 3141 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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a-mediterranean2-comp1 - The Mediterranean the worlds...

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