intro-PII-compressed2

intro-PII-compressed2 - Domestication and Agriculture: The...

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Domestication and Agriculture: The Neolithic Revolution SW Asia, China, Americas Cultural materialism: Marvin Harris = “the primacy of the infrastructure,” i.e., changes in socio-politics (structure) and worldview (superstructure) result from changes in techno-economies (infrastructure) But, evidence of significant change in ritual, social inequality, and ideology also are quite early and must be understood as more than the outcome of population growth resulting from food production, such as feasting Nonetheless, food production did provide the basis for most political economies with substantial populations, or civilization Review Chapter 5
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Civilization “the process of civilizing or becoming civilized the condition of being civilized; social organization of a high order, marked by advances in the arts, sciences, etc. the total culture of a people, nation, period, etc. the countries and peoples considered to have reached a high stage of social and cultural development .” “Civilize: to bring out of a condition of savagery or barbarism; instruct in the ways of advanced society (Webster’s) Cultural bias (ethnocentrism), history (the tyranny of the ethnographic/historical record), cultural relativism, and the “psychic unity” of humankind, and gender
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Gautama Buddha: 563 BC (Nepal) to 483 BC (India) Jesus Christ: 7–2 BC (Bethlehem) to AD 26–36 (Golgatha) Mohammad: AD 570 (Mecca) to 632 (Medina) Crusades: AD 1095-1291
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The History of “Civilization” Western History - The West: Greece, Rome, Feudal Europe, and modern Europe (West/East Roman Empire; Crusades) The East: Asian civilizations Orientalism (Edward Said, 1978): the construction of the “Orient” as the alter-ego of the “West” in European discourse, that generally portrayed Western civilization as more progressive (advanced) The Tropics (Tropicality): Other Civilizations – The “primitive” world Native American, Sub-Saharan African, Pacific Islands Large, developed civilizations in many non-Western settuings seen as influenced from elsewhere (Europe, Near and Middle East) until mid-19 th century, and later in some cases (Amazon)
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Guns, Germs, and Steel; Ocean Travel; Conquest, Colonialism, Plunder, and Slavery Gunpowder (China: ca. AD 1050) Imported to Europe by ca. AD 1250 Cannons by early 1300s (beginning of the end of feudalism?) In the 1400s, the first mechanical firing mechanism, the matchlock, was developed.
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course ANT 3141 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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intro-PII-compressed2 - Domestication and Agriculture: The...

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