Lecture%207%20Adaptation%20to%20low%20nutrient%20availability

Lecture%207%20Adaptation%20to%20low%20nutrient%20availability

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/20/11 Lecture 7 Adaptations to low nutrient availability Wetlands Carnivorous plants
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2/20/11 Wetlands The definition, accepted by most scientists, was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and was adopted in 1979: “Wetlands are lands transitional between terrestrial and aquatic systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by SHALLOW water.”
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2/20/11 Tidal, non-tidal
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2/20/11 Swamp:
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2/20/11 Bogs
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2/20/11 Fens Peat-forming wetlands that get nutrients from sources other than just precipitation Less acidic and higher fertility than bogs Grasses, sedges, rushes, http://water.epa.gov/type/wetlands/f en.cfm
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2/20/11 Wetland values Biodiversity Food and habitat for fisheries 75% of harvested fish are wetland dependent 95% of shellfish species Water storage and filtration
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2/20/11 San Francisco garter snake -wetland habitats -feeds on frogs -collected to near extinction Wetland contain many endemic and endangered plants and animals
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2/20/11 Values of Wetlands 1. Food and habitat for biological populations 2. Ecosystem benefits A. Flood mitigation (stormwater retention)
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2/20/11 Values of Wetlands 1. Food and habitat for biological populations 2. Ecosystem benefits A. Flood mitigation (stormwater retention) B. Storm surge protection
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2/20/11 1973 Oct. 05, 6 weeks post-Katrina
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2/20/11
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Lecture%207%20Adaptation%20to%20low%20nutrient%20availability

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