{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

week 2 - History of Games Spring 2011

week 2 - History of Games Spring 2011 - ITP 280 Video Game...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Information Technology Program ITP 280 Video Game Production Week 2 – History of Video Games Spring 2011
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Timeline: History of Video Games 1962 1962 1971 1971 1972 1972 Tennis for Two by William Higinbotha m. Spacewar! by Steve Russell for the PDP-1 Computer Space by Nolan Bushnell Nolan Bushnell forms Atari In the Beginning… In the Beginning… 1958 1958
Image of page 2
Timeline: History of Video Games 1973 1973 Magnavox Odyssey. 1974 1974 1975 1975 1976 1976 Atari releases Pong. Atari sells 10,000 Pong games. 90,000 Pong clones. Home Systems. 25 different companies make home video game machines, most play versions of Pong. “Channel F” released. Warner Communications buys Atari. The Pong Era The Pong Era 1972 1972
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Timeline: The Atari Era 1977 1977 1978 1978 Atari 2600 released. 1979 1979 1980 1980 1981 1981 Atari survives Christmas. Space Invaders released. Magnavox releases the Odyssey2. Atari releases Asteroids. Activision formed Atari sues Activision. Namco releases Pac-Man . Nintendo releases Donkey Kong . Home video game market reaches $200 million. Mattel releases the Intellivision. Space Invaders is the first game licensed for a home system.
Image of page 4
Timeline: The Atari Era Part II 1982 1982 Sony and Philips jointly develop audio compact disc. 1983 1983 1984 1984 Coleco releases Colecovision. December 1982, Warner stock drops 33% in one day. Atari releases a game based on the movie E.T. Third party publishers start to go bankrupt. Games start selling for cheaper prices. Warner breaks up Atari, Atari Games sold to Namco. Mattel sells its Mattel Electronics division. Atari settles suit with Activision. Atari loses over $500 million. Nintendo releases the Famicom in Japan. Atari releases the 5200. Home video game market reaches $3 billion. Retail price of Atari 2600 and Mattel Intellivision drop below $50. 1983 1983
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1985 1985 Nintendo’s Famicom sells 6.5 million units in Japan. NES is test marketed in the U.S. off the basis of the Famicom. 1986 1986 1987 1987 Atari and INTV release new home game systems. Sega releases the Master System, an 8-bit machine designed to compete directly with the NES. The Legend of Zelda becomes Nintendo’s first game to sell over one million units. Acclaim becomes the first U.S. company licensed to make games for the NES. Nintendo rolls out the NES nationwide. It costs $180. Super Mario Bros. U.S. home video game market bottoms out at $100 million. Nintendo has 25 companies licensed to make games for the NES. Timeline: The Nintendo Era
Image of page 6
1988 1988 1989 1989 1990 1990 Timeline: The Nintendo Era Part II The NES has an installed base of 7 million and 40 companies are licensed to make games for it.
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern