Chapter 5 Exceptionality

Chapter 5 Exceptionality - Chapter 5 Chapter 5 Society...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 5 Chapter 5 Society tended to treat those with disabilities much like other oppressed minority groups.  As late as the 1970s, many of those with disabilities, particularly with moderate to severe disabilities, were institutionalized.  Placed in institutions often far from their families, they were often forgotten. Exceptional Students are those students with disabilities, and those who are gifted and talented, who may require special education services in school to reach their full educational potential. Special education is the educational programming designed to meet the unique learning and developmental needs of a student who is exceptional. Individuals with disabilities are expected to subordinate their interests and desires to the goals of programs decreed for them by professionals who provide services to them.  Federal laws provide for the basic civil rights for individuals with disabilities, but the laws cannot prevent ignorance or insensitivity. The U.S. Supreme Court determined in Brown that if a state provides a free education for its citizenry, a property right of an education is established.  The U.S. Constitution prohibits the deprivation of life, liberty, or property without due process. Using the Brown decision, attorneys argued that having undertaken a free public education for the children of Pennsylvania, the state could not deny children with mental disabilities the same. The earlier students with mental disabilities are provided education, the greater the amount of learning that can be predicted. The Federal District Court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs.  All children between ages 6 and 21 must be provided free public education.  The court indicated that children with mental disabilities are to be educated in programs most like those for their peers without disabilities. This case was a class action suit for 18,000 out-of- school children with disabilities in the District of Columbia. The childrens disabilities included behavior problems, hyperactivity, epilepsy, mental disabilities, and physical impairments.  Brown was also used as the plaintiffs argument.  The court mandated that the school district provide all children with disabilities a public-supported education. The school district was ordered to provide due process safeguards....
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Chapter 5 Exceptionality - Chapter 5 Chapter 5 Society...

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