lecture.5 - 1 There are two types of Igneous Rocks:...

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There are two types of Igneous Rocks: Volcanic and Plutonic. Volcanic rocks are formed by the eruption of a volcano. Such eruption brings magma up to the surface of the Earth, creating lava (once magma is exposed on the surface, runs on the surface, it’s called lava and not magma). Igneous rocks are formed (i.e. cooled down) inside, under the surface of the Earth. This is why the cooling mechanisms differ, hence the size of the minerals that compose those rocks: volcanic rocks cool quickly so the minerals have very little time to form large crystals; plutonic rocks cool slowly so the minerals have more time to form and make larger crystals. 2
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These are the different bodies that intrusive rocks (i.e. Plutonic) can form. See the difference between the formation of intrusive and extrusive rocks. The intrusive rocks are very important gem-forming rocks because of the time and cooling process, leading to the crystallization of larger specimens. The location of ore-bodies (i.e. the places where we can find higher concentrations of the gems we are
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lecture.5 - 1 There are two types of Igneous Rocks:...

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