What_America_Eats - -4 =ianñ< A]po...

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Unformatted text preview: -4 =ianñ_]< A]po Sd]p ( <Sdaj ( <]j`<Sdana BY A. ELIZABETH SLOAN Sd]p ( < Sdaj ( < ]j`<Sdana W hile three-quarters of all adults ate last night’s meal at home, the number of meals prepared at home continues to decline, falling from 64% in 2003 to 58% in 2005 (MSI, 2005). “Scratch” dinners prepared at home dropped another 7% over the past two years and now account for only 32% of all evening meals. One- quarter (26%) of last night’s dinners used convenience foods and 17% used restaurant/supermarket take-out, while 23% were eaten at a restaurant. Taking Out & Eating In Americans are now more likely to take out food from a restaurant than to eat on-site (NPD, 2005a). In 2005, Americans ate 80 meals per person at restaurants, down from 93 in 1985, and took home 57 restaurant meals per person, up from 33 meals 20 years ago. Americans carried 27 restaurant meals to work this year, vs 23 in 1985. One out of every five restaurant meals (22%) were purchased from a car this year, up from 14% in 1998 (NPD, 2005a); 32 restaurant meals per person were eaten in the car, the highest level ever recorded by NPD. Although 86% of all take-out meals still come from quick-service restaurants (QSRs), 6% from casual-dining chains, and 8% from mid-scale/family eateries, casual- dining take-out is the only area showing growth (Duecy, 2005a). Applebee’s Carside To Go program represented more than 10% of its total restaurant sales this year, up 9.4% over 2004; Romano’s Macaroni Grill 7%; and Ruby Tuesday 6% . Nearly two- thirds (61%) of those under age 35, 54% of those 35–54, and 45% of those 55 and older use full-service take-out at least once a week (Technomic, 2005a). Entrees and side dishes are the most frequently ordered take-out items at casual-dining restaurants, and Asian food, pizza, pasta, Mexican food, and shellfish top the list (NPD, 2005b). Pizza, burgers, and Chinese are the top take-out choices overall (Technomic, 2005a; Sloan, 2005a). And there’s room to grow. NPD (2005c) reports that only 28% of curb- side customers order appetizers and 44% order non-alcoholic beverages, compared to 39% and 72%, respec- tively, of on-premise diners. Less than 20% of curbside patrons order sandwiches, and less than 10% order breads/sweet rolls, desserts, breakfast foods, and snacks (Duecy, 2005a). Eating Out When it comes to restaurants, consum- ers want choices—hearty vs healthy, small portions vs super-sized, gourmet vs good value, and ethnic authenticity vs down-home style. Not surprisingly, healthy and not-so-healthy foods exist side by side on the Top 10 lists of 19 pg 01.06 • www.ift.org S T A T E - O F - T H E - I N D U S T R Y R E P O R T More take-out foods, a penchant for premium, and a very healthy attitude are redeFning what Americans eat. lc ., ., ,-*,2<< ¡ <<sss*ebp*knc =ianñ_]< A]po Sd]p ( <Sdaj ( <]j`<Sdana America’s most frequently con- sumed restaurant foods, although burgers, French fries, and pizza still top the list (Table 1; NPD, 2005c). top the list (Table 1; NPD, 2005c)....
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2011 for the course FOOD SCI 201 taught by Professor Horowitz during the Spring '10 term at University of Wisconsin.

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What_America_Eats - -4 =ianñ< A]po...

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