readnotes2 - AU OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.athabascau.edu...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AU OpenCourseWare http://ocw.athabascau.edu Connors, Martin, Reading Notes on Vibrations and Waves. Athabasca, AB: Athabasca University, 2010. Please use the following citation format: Connors, Martin, Reading Notes on Vibrations and Waves. (Athabasca University: AU OpenCourseWare). http://owc.athabascau.ca (accessed [Date]). License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike. Note: Please use the actual date you accessed this material in your citation. For more information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.athabascau.ca/terms
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
PHYS 302 : Unit 2 Reading Notes – Athabasca University 1 PHYS 320: Vibrations and Waves – Unit 2 Reading Notes French, A. P. Vibrations and Waves . New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1971. Chapter 2: The Superposition of Periodic Motions (pp. 19–29, up to “Combination of Two Vibrations…”). Chapter 3: The Free Vibrations of Physical Systems (pp. 62–70, up to “Problems”). Chapter 2: The Superposition of Periodic Motions Superposed Vibrations in One Dimension (p. 19) Many physical quantities add together simply, or linearly, especially when perturbations are small. When adding superposed vibrations in one dimension, we can simply sum the effects, adding the solutions we have found for vibrations. There are two important sub-cases: a) when vibrations of equal frequency are superposed, and b) when vibrations of nearly equal frequency are superposed. Another one, (not in the text) is when a high-frequency wave is modulated by a low frequency wave to carry the low frequency information. An example of this is AM radio, where sound information in the kHz range is modulated onto a radio wave of about 100× higher frequency, which carries the sound well beyond the range that sound could reasonably reach alone. AM stands for amplitude modulation , meaning that the amplitude of the high-frequency carrier is modulated by the low-frequency sound.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course PHYS 320 taught by Professor Martinconner during the Spring '10 term at Open Uni..

Page1 / 3

readnotes2 - AU OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.athabascau.edu...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online